Upcoming

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26. October 2019 – 31. January 2020
Group Show, MdbK, Leipzig

The Supermarket of Images

16. October 2019 – 13. February 2020
Group Show, Je de Paume, Paris

Vienna Biennale 2019

28. May 2019 – 27. May 2020
Group Show, MAK Design Labors, Vienna

Modell und Ruine

25. May – 9. June 2019
Group Show, Werkleitz Festival, Dessau

On the occasion of the Bauhaus anniversary, the Werkleitz Festival 2019 will take place from May 25th to June 9th in Dessau-Roßlau. In the title model stands as a model for a future to be created and ruin as a testimony of a mostly idealized past. The aim of the festival is to locate the Bauhaus in a broader historical context. Thirteen artists are invited to this project, who dedicate themselves in Dessau from the current perspective to the poles of power model and ruin.

Workshop: True Depth

18. April 2019
Workshop, HeK, Basel

Panel Discussion

17. April 2019
Talk, HeK, Basel

BYOD

12. April 2019
Talk, Drugo More, Rijeka, Croatia

If birds in a truck fly, does the truck get lighter?

11. – 30. April 2019
Group Show, Drugo More, Rijeka, Croatia

SF MOMA: Snap + Share

24. March – 4. August 2019
Group Show, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco

SFMOMA: snap+share
transmitting photographs from mail art to social networks
March 30–August 4, 2019
https://www.sfmoma.org/exhibition/snap/

The exhibition snap+share gives visitors a new way to visualize — and experience — how photographs have become so ubiquitous in our daily lives. Whether through early examples of 1960s and ’70s mail art, physical piles of pictures uploaded to the Internet over a 24-hour period, or a working refrigerator that allows participatory meme-making, visitors can trace the evolution of sharing photographs.

Spanning the history of mail art to social networks, the show presents a variety of artists working in various media, from framed paper-based art to immersive installations. Some of these artists include On Kawara, Ray Johnson, Moyra Davey, Erik Kessels, Corinne Vionnet, and David Horvitz. Exploring how networks are created through the act of sending images out into the world, this exhibition reveals just how those networks have changed in the age of the Internet.

curated by Clement Cheroux
with: Thomas Bachler, Ray Johnson, Aram Bartholl, On Kawara, Joseph Beuys, Erik Kessels , Moyra Davey, William Larson, Jan Dibbets, Eva and Franco Mattes, Walker Evans, Peter Miller, Jeff Guess, Ken Ohara, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Stephen Shore, Kate Hollenbach, Endre Tót, David Horvitz, Corinne Vionnet

Biennale d’art contemporain de Strasbourg

13. December 2018 – 31. March 2019
Group Show, Hotel des Postes, Strasbourg, France

Blog Archive for Month: May 2016

Long Lasting LED

May 30, 2016

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‘Long Lasting LED’
by Nadja Buttendorf & Aram Bartohll
Video, 2:02 min
Los Angeles
2016

Greenscreen Venice

May 23, 2016

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Greenscreen Venice
Venice, Los Angeles 2016

Live stream intervention involving a green screen, periscope.tv & Venice. Thanks to the team!! Credits to: Nadja Buttendorf, Theo Triantafyllidis, Lee Tusman, Ashley B. & periscope.tv

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All pics on flickr!!

Build And Run

May 18, 2016

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This is a screen shot of the very first computer game I ever made!! You can download it for PC here or play it online here!

Build And Run
dimension: 1024 x 768px, medium: computer game, PC & web
Aram Bartholl
2016

 

 

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CryptoNails & KillYourPhone

May 17, 2016

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The workshop night at Machine Project in L.A. with Crypto Nails by Nadja Buttendorf and KILLYOURPHONE.COM  was very much fun! Thx to Machine Project for hosting this event!! & thx to the people for stat-us.org for inviting us!! Also thanks  to Simon Steiner from Otis for this super cool handmade screen print poster!!

http://machineproject.com/2016/events/kill-your-phone-crypto-nails/
Saturday, April 30, 8:00pm–10:00pm
1200 N Alvarado St, Los Angeles, CA 90026, USA

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ALL PICTURES on flickr!!

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How to share a UCLA all day parking ticket

May 17, 2016

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How to share a 12,-$ UCLA parking ticket:

  1. Get your 12,- $ all day visitor parking ticket .
  2. Leave it in the car as long as you park at UCLA.
  3. When you leave pass it on!
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DOMENICO QUARANTA: Oh, When the Internet Breaks at Some Point

May 15, 2016
An essay by Domenico Quaranta about the piece Keepalive recently published on mefsite.wordpress.com – MEDIA IN THE EXPANDED FIELD, A collaborative platform for the participants in the think tank ‘Media in the Expanded Field’, curated by Montabonel & Partners.
THX!!

DOMENICO QUARANTA: Oh, When the Internet Breaks at Some Point

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“Walked out this morning / Don’t believe what I saw / A hundred billion bottles / Washed up on the shore / Seems I’m not alone at being alone / A hundred billion castaways / Looking for a home” The Police, “Message in a Bottle”, 1979

Back in October 2010, German artist Aram Bartholl cemented 5 USB flash drives in various locations in New York, as part of an Eyebeam residency. [1] Referring to the way, in espionage, items are passed between two individuals using a secret location and without an actual meeting, he called the project Dead Drops. The first five dead drops were empty, except for a small readme file explaining the project. A dedicated website was set up, featuring a video tutorial and a simple “how to” and inviting people to participate in the project.

In interviews, Bartholl explained that at the beginning he was just fascinated by the power of an image: a small data container plugged in the wall, in public space, and a person trying to access it with her own device. He invited people to participate by dropping files in and taking files out, installing their own dead drop and sending the GPS coordinates to Bartholl. As in many collaborative projects, he wasn’t particularly confident about people’s participation, and he believed that the project was conceptually strong enough even in the shape of a small, five-nodes network. But people liked the idea, and as I’m typing on my keyboard today, the online database features almost 1500 registered dead drops for a total storage space of 9891 gigabytes. I installed my own a while ago and I’ve noticed some others along the years, and I’ve always been fascinated by the precariousness of these tiny, rusty artifacts. I’ve never seen anybody plugging in, and probably most of them are almost empty, or out of work. But they are, still, extremely powerful as an image.

Message in a Bottle

“A Dead Drop is a naked piece of passively powered Universal Serial Bus technology embedded into the city, the only true public space. In an era of growing clouds and fancy new devices without access to local files we need to rethink the freedom and distribution of data. The Dead Drops movement is on its way for change! Free your data to the public domain in cement! Make your own Dead Drop now! Un-cloud your files today!!!” Aram Bartholl, “The Dead Drops Manifesto”, 2010 [2]

The dead drops network emerged in an age that saw a major shift in the general perception of the internet as a public space. Widespread Wi-Fi access, the massive adoption of social networking sites, and the advent of smartphones made people start to think about the internet as a new public space, with no physical boundaries and infrastructure, where data can be shared and taken easily and seamlessly. The metaphor of the cloud, already used in the Nineties to describe the internet, became more and more popular in the late 2000s, when cloud computing emerged – further reinforcing the idea of an immaterial public space and eroding the difference between public and private, local and shared. As Annet Dekker wrote in 2008:

……

READ ON FULL ESSAY HERE

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