2019

Open

Solo Show
26. September – 8. November 2019

For his first solo exhibition in Switzerland, Aram Bartholl delves in to origins, effects and legacies of our daily usage of social media through portable devices. Built on the ashes of a scaled, thin-paper model of the Facebook HQ front sign in Menlo Park, California, which burned down in a fire before the opening, the exhibition brings together in a cohesive installation a new set of printed, sculptural and video works.

A recent study reported on the New York Times by writer and journalist Benedict Carey, found that phone users switched screen activities every 20 seconds on average, and rarely spent more than 20 minutes uninterrupted doing any one of them. With the daily screen time of an adult being 8 to 10 hours today, scientists have started to look into our habits and screen-shifting patterns. Adapting the concept of genome, the genetic code that determines the characteristics of a living beings, experts feel now able to identify a “screenome”, as each individual screen-time experience appears to be sequential, disjointed and unique.

A series of floating open hands, the images of which are photos from an online stock agency, gesture towards one another in a semi-open position, as a sign of collaboration and participation as well as leading back to the way we hold our smartphones. The withstanding frame of the burned-up work remains on its ashes at the center of the room, while a video of the fire – apolitical act of protest against what is today the largest sharing platform, is playing on a screen. A number of disused phones lies on the ground on a pile of fire-retardant debris, some of which have come to cover copies of a free local newspaper on a nearby table. Inside, an article denounces swimmers’ difficulties in separating from their smartphone while in the waters of the river Aare, Switzerland.

The personal computer, the internet and, most recently, the smartphone represents a paradigm shift in the way we communicate today. The promise of openness and equality of the World Wide Web has now been superseded by gigantic sharing platforms such as Facebook which, together with our devices, collect and contain the most intimate track record of our emotional and personal history. Shading light on a society of which interactions are shaped and controlled by machines we cannot fully understand neither control, making us in fact controlled by them, Bartholl addresses electronic waste as a moment of emotional detachment from our past experiences though equally liberating from the slavery of control to which we are involuntarily subjected.

Speed Show: FACE THE FACE

Group Show
5. July 2019

FACE THE FACE
A Speed Show on the Post-Digital Self

curated by
Anika Meier & Aram Bartholl
Internet Cafe – Midnightshop, Schönhauser Allee 188, Ecke Torstr., 10119 Berlin

Participating artists:
Lisette Appeldorn, Jeremy Bailey, Nadja Buttendorf, Petra Cortright, Constant Dullaart, Tom Galle, Lauren Huret, Johanna Jaskowska, Andy Kassier, Hanneke Klaver, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Echo Can Luo, Ines Marzat, Jillian Mayer, Andy Picci, Selam X

Text at http://speedshow.net/speed-show-face-the-face/

SF MOMA: Snap + Share

Group Show
24. March – 4. August 2019

SFMOMA: snap+share
transmitting photographs from mail art to social networks
March 30–August 4, 2019
https://www.sfmoma.org/exhibition/snap/

The exhibition snap+share gives visitors a new way to visualize — and experience — how photographs have become so ubiquitous in our daily lives. Whether through early examples of 1960s and ’70s mail art, physical piles of pictures uploaded to the Internet over a 24-hour period, or a working refrigerator that allows participatory meme-making, visitors can trace the evolution of sharing photographs.

Spanning the history of mail art to social networks, the show presents a variety of artists working in various media, from framed paper-based art to immersive installations. Some of these artists include On Kawara, Ray Johnson, Moyra Davey, Erik Kessels, Corinne Vionnet, and David Horvitz. Exploring how networks are created through the act of sending images out into the world, this exhibition reveals just how those networks have changed in the age of the Internet.

curated by Clement Cheroux
with: Thomas Bachler, Ray Johnson, Aram Bartholl, On Kawara, Joseph Beuys, Erik Kessels , Moyra Davey, William Larson, Jan Dibbets, Eva and Franco Mattes, Walker Evans, Peter Miller, Jeff Guess, Ken Ohara, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Stephen Shore, Kate Hollenbach, Endre Tót, David Horvitz, Corinne Vionnet

True Depth

Solo Show
25. January – 10. February 2019
SMAC, Berlin

Opening event: 24.01.2019 | 19h
Duration: 25.01 – 10.03.2019
Opening Hours: Friday – Sunday, 13h – 19h

For his upcoming solo show True Depth at SMAC Aram Bartholl creates a new set of works discussing the changing circumstances of personal space in today’s screen based, app connected world. While the smartphone introduced new ways of very intimate communication, Internet advertising companies monetize in large scale on these interactions. Traveling alone in public space became the perfect situation for personal interaction on small screens. “Don’t sit next to me on the bus. I am watching gay porn.” (quote Twitter). While out with friends the restaurant bathroom turns into a place to check the phone instead of actually going there to relieve one self. Post social spaces.
The title True Depth refers to the latest iPhone camera 3D scanning technology to improve face recognition. Invisible infrared patterns questions the personal space between eyes and screen. “Where are you?”

Security Personal Information Protection High Strength Spring Anchor Collapsible

Interview for SMAC: http://smac-berlin.de/interview-aram-bartholl

2018

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Solo Show
31. August – 7. November 2018

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Solo show at Emmanuel gallery, Denver University of Colorado
August 31 – November 17, 2018
Opening August 30, 6:00 pm

Ein gemachter Mensch – Künstlerische Fragen an Identitäten

Group Show
26. May – 16. September 2018
Kallmann Museum, Ismaning, Germany

Ein gemachter Mensch – Künstlerische Fragen an Identitäten

26. Mai bis 16. September 2018

With: Selma Alaçam, Aram Bartholl, Martin Brand, James Bridle, Harun Farocki, Sandra Filic, Iwajla Klinke, Alicja Kwade, Sali Muller, Timea Anita Oravecz, Daniela Risch, Nasan Tur, Anna Witt, Veronika Witte, Naneci Yurdagül

Wer bin ich eigentlich? Und warum bin ich so, wie ich bin? Im 21. Jahrhundert scheint die Antwort auf diese Frage zunehmend komplex geworden zu sein. Herkömmliche Identitäten lösen sich auf oder werden neu interpretiert, zugleich gibt es gänzlich neue Möglichkeiten der Herausbildung von Identitäten. Dabei stellt sich die Frage, wie weit die menschliche Identität ›gemacht‹, also durch eigene Entscheidungen und Handlungen bestimmt wird, und wie sehr Aspekte eine Rolle spielen, auf die man als Einzelner keinen Einfluss hat. Die internationale Gruppenausstellung im Kallmann-Museum geht diesen Fragen aus künstlerischer Perspektive nach.

Unterschiedlichste Aspekte spielen bei der Bestimmung der eigenen Identität eine Rolle. Beginnend bei der Feststellung, überhaupt ein Mensch zu sein, der sich seiner selbst gewahr wird, über die Nationalität, den eigenen Körper, über Riten und Traditionen bis hin zur Sprache oder der gewöhnlichen alltäglichen Umgebung. Dabei hat man zahllose Möglichkeiten, Zugehörigkeiten festzulegen oder auch nur vorübergehend eine andere Identität anzunehmen, etwa im Spiel. Gleichzeitig werden einem fortlaufend Merkmale zugeschrieben, die Identität ausdrücken sollen und mit denen man sich auseinandersetzen muss. Identität ist demnach das Ergebnis eines fortlaufenden Prozesses zwischen Selbst- und Fremdbestimmung und immer veränderlich. Dieser Prozess kann nie in seiner Gesamtheit abgebildet werden. Einige zentrale Aspekte aber werden in Ismaning künstlerisch betrachtet und auf ihre identitätsstiftende Bedeutung hin befragt.

Flyer (german): Kallmann-Museum_Flyer_2018_Identitaet.pdf