Upcoming

The Sea Is Glowing

1. August 2020 – 1. November 2020
Group Show, Exportdrvo, Rijeka

An international group exhibition which deals with the invisible economics linked to the sea. With their works, world-respected artists deal with unusual and radical phenomena, from strange online shops to the empires of amateur pornography and other golden coasts.

In the geographical sense, Europe is a maritime continent: considering the ratio of the length of the coast to the total land surface, Europe has more contact with the sea than any other continent. For Rijeka, the port, as well as the sea, is not only a place of loading and unloading or the arrivals and departures of boats. The port is the heart of the city and symbolically important for the identity of the city. This is why the sea, i.e. new forms of work and economy which are connected to the sea, is extremely important for both Rijeka and Europe.

The Sea is Glowing exhibition focuses primarily on new invisible economies that are inextricably linked to the sea, such as the exploration of oil and ores in the depths of the sea, the establishment of offshore tax havens on the coasts and the launch of libertarian start-ups in self-sufficient colonies which float in international waters. All of the mentioned activities are part of the new economies which include new forms of work (such as care and welfare) or new forms of capital circulation (such as free ports). Considering the (occasional) specificity of their tax models, port cities such as Rijeka are very important for such types of economies. The exhibition brings together the works of artists who investigate unusual Amazon shops, the increasingly present outsourcing of healthcare, “the black chimneys” and deep-sea mining, the hidden offshore havens, the dark empires of amateur pornography and other golden coasts.

The curator of the exhibition is Inke Arns (DE), famous for her work in media art. She is the artistic director of the Dortmund Hartware MedienKunstVerein (HMKV) organisation and the curator of numerous international exhibitions that have been shown around Europe and the world – from Berlin, Glasgow and Warsaw, from Ljubljana and Nova Sad, all the way to Moscow, Tel Aviv and Hong Kong.

Stadt der partizipativen Visionen

1. August – 31. December 2020
Group Show, ZKM - Zentrum für Kunst und Medien, Karlsruhe

Seasons of Media Arts. Stadt der partizipativen Visionen
ZKM | Zentrum für Kunst und Medien

Current

On entering a living being. From Social Sculpture to Platform Capitalism

18. May – 16. August 2020
Group Show, Kunstraum Kreuzberg, Berlin

Eintritt in ein Lebewesen. Von der Sozialen Skulptur zum Plattformkapitalismus
On entering a living being. From Social Sculpture to Platform Capitalism

When Joseph Beuys coined the phrase of the “social sculpture” in the 1970s, he was not aware of the development of the internet at the same time. However, in interviews and lectures he frequently hints at the possibility of a new kind of medium, that would allow the audience to participate and that could serve as a plattform for political debate and action.

With the international proliferation of the internet and the possibility of communication and cooperation that it has delivered, it is timely to compare its promise with the utopian ideas of Joseph Beuys. Has the net enabled new forms of collective creativity? Or does it serve as a means to turn this
“general intellect” (K. Marx) into raw material that companies like Google, Facebook, Twitter et al use to make a profit?

The exhibition with works by approximately 38 artists reflects the methods by which companies such as YouTube, Google, Fiverr or Amazon Mechanical Turk have made the exploitation of the creativity of their users into a business model. About half of the works were created in response to the current
“platform capitalism”. A selection of older works traces the idea of “collective creativity” back to original emancipatory ideas from the early days of the Internet such as “crowd sourcing” and finally to Joseph Beuys’ “social sculpture”.

Over the last decade, a number of companies have made a business model out of offering plattforms for the sale of creative work on the web as online services or “microjobs”. Through providers such as Amazon Mechanical Turk or Fiverr, creative services such as texts, designs, videos or apps can be commissioned for prices that are often far below the fee that a professional designer would charge. In many ways, the artistic works that were once thought of as “crowd sourcing art” – a genre that has its own Wikipedia entry by now – today seem like naive anticipations of these exploitative practices,
which in turn have also been reflected by artists in recent years.

The exhibition brings together works that comment on and criticize the “gig economy” that has emerged, and by juxtaposing them with works from the nineties and noughties, places them in a historical context that ultimately dates back to Joseph Beuys’ “social sculpture” – some of the artists involved even explicitly referenced Beuys and his slogan: “Everyone is an artist.” The exhibition will be accompanied by events that address the model of “platform capitalism” in the cultural sphere in discussions, video presentations and lectures.

Participating artists:
Cory Arcangel, Joseph Beuys, Aram Bartholl, Natalie Bookchin, Irene Chabr, James Coupe, Andy Deck, Constant Dullaart, Mark Flood, John D. Freyer, Aaron Koblin & Daniel Massey, Steffen Köhn, JODI, Miranda July & Harrell Fletcher, Olia Lialina, Jonas Lund, Judy Malloy, Michael Mandiberg, Neozoon, OMSK Social Club, Nam June Paik, Mark Salvatus, Sebastian Schmieg & Silvio Lorusso, Ralph Schulz, Guido Segni, Johannes StÜttgen, Alex Tew, Amalia Ulman, Van Gogh TV

Curated by Tilman Baumgärtel, Hochschule Mainz

Recent

Die kleine Intervention: Weniger Spektakel, mehr Wirkung?

13. February 2020
Performance, Brecht-Haus, Berlin

Die kleine Intervention: Weniger Spektakel, mehr Wirkung?
Mit Aram Bartholl und Helgard Haug (Rimini Protokoll)
Moderation Cornelius Puschke

Veranstaltungsort: Literaturforum im Brecht-Haus
Einlass: ab 18:30 Uhr

Anhand von Aram Bartholls »Dead Drops« (mit Live-Installation!) und Projekten von Rimini Protokoll geht es um die Frage, ob kleine, unauffälligere Aktionsformen letztlich wirksamer sind als skandalöse Groß-Interventionen.

The Supermarket Of Images

11. February – 7. June 2020
Group Show, Jeu de Paume, Paris

We live in a world that is increasingly saturated with images. Their number is growing so exponentially – each day more than three billion images are shared on social networks – that the space of visibility seems to be literally inundated. As if it can no longer contain the images that constitute it. As if there were no more room, no more interstices between the images. This brings us closer to the point that Walter Benjamin imagined, almost a hundred years ago now, as “the one hundred percent image space”. Faced with such an overproduction of images, questions need to be asked, more than ever before, about their storage, management, transportation (even if it is electronic) and the paths they follow, their weight, the fluidity or viscosity of their exchanges, their fluctuating values – in short, questions about their economy.

In the book from which this exhibition is derived1, the economic aspect of the life of images is called iconomy. The works and artists chosen for the exhibition cast a keen and watchful eye over these issues. On the one hand, they reflect the upheavals that currently affect the economy in general, whether in terms of unprecedentedly large storage spaces, the scarcity of raw materials, labour and its mutations into intangible forms, or in terms of value and its new manifestations, such as cryptocurrencies. On the other hand, however, these works also question what happens to visibility in the age of globalized iconomies: caught up in an incessant circulation, the image – any image – appears increasingly like a freeze frame (arrêt sur image), that is as a temporary crystallization, as the provisionally stabilized balance of the speeds that constitute it.

In the supermarket on display here, images of the economy always involve the economy of the image. And vice versa, as if they were the recto and verso of the same page.

Particiapting artists:
Kevin Abosch, Aram Bartholl, Taysir Batniji, Samuel Bianchini, Robert Bresson, Sophie Calle, Maurizio Cattelan, Emma Charles, Chia Chuyia, Minerva Cuevas, DISNOVATION.ORG, Antje Ehmann, Sergueï Eisenstein, Max de Esteban, Harun Farocki, Sylvie Fleury, Beatrice Gibson, Máximo González, Jeff Guess, Andreas Gursky, Li Hao, Femke Herregraven, Lauren Huret, Geraldine Juárez, William Kentridge, Yves Klein, Martin Le Chevallier, Zoe Leonard, Auguste et Louis, Lumière, Kazimir Malévitch, Elena Modorati, László Moholy-Nagy, Andreï Molodkin, Ana Vitória Mussi, Trevor Paglen, Julien Prévieux, Wilfredo Prieto, Rosângela Rennó, Hans Richter, Martha Rosler, Evan Roth, Thomas Ruff, RYBN.ORG, Richard Serra, Hito Steyerl, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Ben Thorp Brown, Victor Vasarely, Pierre Weiss

Curated by
Peter Szendy, Emmanuel Alloa and Marta Ponsa
Exhibition organised by the Jeu de Paume

Co Talk

11. February 2020
Talk, Co Gallery, Paris

Artist talk at Co Gallery, Paris.

8 pm, Feb 11th 2020

co.galerie
8 rue de Douai
Pigalle
75009 Paris

← Archive

Blog

Radio Spätkauf – Interview

June 29, 2020

This mini episode features Daniel Stern interviewing artist Aram Barthall about his recent installation “Unlock Life” which utilizes remnants of the recent bike share boom.

Find out more about at Aram Bartholl at https://arambartholl.com and see the exhibit until the 16th of August at https://www.kunstraumkreuzberg.de.

http://www.radiospaetkauf.com/2020/06/rs-mini-unlock-life/

Tagged with: +

Interview: Face the Face

May 15, 2020

Face the Face
Ein Gespräch mit Prof. Aram Bartholl über Maskierung im öffentlichen Raum.

Autor, Björn Lange, 23-04-2020
https://magazine.fork.de/masquerade/face-the-face

Dieses Gespräch kam eher durch Zufall zustande: Nachdem das Thema für die fünfte Ausgabe des Unstable Mag feststand, hörte ich im Radio einen Beitrag über ein Seminar an der Hochschule für Angewandte Wissenschaften Hamburg (HAW Hamburg) – Face the Face. Bei dem Projekt unter der Leitung von Prof. Aram Bartholl stand unter anderem Gesichtserkennung im Fokus, sowie die analogen Möglichkeiten, sich digital unkenntlich zu machen. Spontan nahm ich im Februar Kontakt auf, und nun, Mitte April, gelang uns endlich das persönliche Treffen, face to face, per Hangout…

Hallo Aram, schön, dass das unter den aktuellen Umständen doch irgendwie mit unserem Gespräch geklappt hat! Ich will gar nicht lange drumrum reden – Fork und das Unstable Mag hatte ich dir ja schon kurz erläutert. Lass uns also direkt einsteigen… Warum überhaupt dieser Ansatz, Gesichtserkennungssoftware umgehen zu wollen? Müssen wir uns verstecken heutzutage?

Gute Frage. Es gibt da unterschiedlichste Meinungen zu. Gerade heute, in Zeiten von Covid-19-App, Tracking, Tracing, Handy-Bewegungsprofilen und so weiter ist das Thema Anonymität für uns als Gesellschaft schon sehr wichtig. Theoretisch wissen wir auch – also viele jedenfalls –, dass unsere Privatsphäre durchaus gefährdet ist, durch große digitale Firmen wie Facebook, Google, Microsoft. Unternehmen, die ohne Ende Daten sammeln. Bloß spüren wir das natürlich nicht. Das eigene Gesicht aber, das ist etwas, das wir alle verstehen: Häh, da ist ein Foto von mir!? Ich glaube, das Gesicht und die Erkennung des Gesichtes und die Diskussion darum ist ein wertvoller Einstieg, um über Privatsphäre zu reden. Ah, ja, es gibt da dieses Clear View, und die haben zwei Milliarden, drei Milliarden Bilder gesammelt von allen Menschen auf der Welt, und jeder kann darauf zugreifen… Äh, das geht doch nicht! Das verstößt doch gegen diese Datenschutzgrundverordnung. Und das verstehen auch Leute, die normalerweise keinen technischen Zugang haben. Und dann kann man auch über Daten im Browser reden und über Cookies und über Tracking-Pixel. Also über Dinge, die viel abstrakter sind und die man nur schwer vermitteln kann.

Lustigerweise haben Leute etwas wie das Gesicht aber gar nicht so sehr auf dem Schirm, oder? Wenn ich da an mein persönliches Umfeld denke – da ist vielen plausibel, dass wenn sie online ihre Daten eingeben, händisch, also Adresse, Geburtsdatum, das übliche, dass sie da bewusster reflektieren, dass Sie gerade Daten Preis geben, als sie es mit ihrem eigenen Gesicht verbinden.

Ja, ich glaube, zu einem gewissen Punkt haben wir uns daran gewöhnt, irgendwie, dass diese Datenfreigabe dazugehört. Ich weiß es nicht genau. Gleichzeitig kann man nun – und das ist so’n bisschen eine andere Diskussion – bei diesem Masken Tragen, den medizinischen Masken, meine ich, eine Form von… ja, Vorbehalt gegenüber der Anonymität beobachten. Hier in Deutschland, da wollen die Leute das nicht so richtig, oder? Am Anfang ist man ganz komisch angeguckt worden im Supermarkt. Jetzt wird es dann doch wahrscheinlich Pflicht, demnächst.

Interessant, dass du das ansprichst. Das wäre sonst eine meiner späteren Fragen gewesen. Mein Eindruck, im Moment, wenn ich einkaufen gehe, ist schon, dass ich mich komisch fühle, weil ich noch keine Maske trage. Also, bei uns hier in Hamburg-Eimsbüttel. Die Quote an getragenen Masken im Supermarkt ist irre hoch, und da hab ich mich schon gefragt, ob sowas wie die aktuelle gesundheitliche Krise als eine Art Türöffner für den Mainstream wirken könnte. Ob wir uns jetzt gerade alle daran gewöhnen, dass Maske eine Option ist?

Ja, genau. Das ist auch eine der interessanten Fragestellungen – ob sich durch diese Corona-Krise entsprechende Dinge, Wahrnehmungen, verändern. Genauso, wie sich derzeit auch vieles in der Kommunikation verändert und ins Digitale verschiebt. Womit wir wieder zu der Gesichtserkennungsdiskussion kommen: Vielleicht ist es demnächst so, dass wir wissen, wir sind online irgendwie “nackt”, aber draußen dann immer voll verschleiert. Der ehemals öffentliche Raum, wird das jetzt ein voll anonymer Raum? Dann gehen wir nach Hause und sind auf Chatroulette wieder nackt, sozusagen. Wird das so eine komische Verkehrung? Und was ich mich auch gefragt habe: Es gibt ja vieles im Bereich der Snapchat- und Instagram-Filter; das ist ja eine Kultur, die jetzt schon eine Weile läuft und auch interessante Ausprägungen besitzt – nicht nur Hundeschnauze, Katzennase oder so. Gerade im asiatischen Raum findet man Video-Streamer und YouTuber, die immer nur mit Avatar auftreten. Bei denen man gar nicht weiß, wie die aussehen, weil die komplett eine Maske auf haben.

Eine digitale oder eine echte?

Eine digitale – Personen, die immer irgendwie was im Gesicht haben oder auch komplett digital verfremdet sind, so dass du gar nicht weißt, wer das ist. Das sind Beispiele für verschiedene Richtungen der Maskierungen. Die gleichzeitig, nebeneinander in unterschiedlichen Kontexten stattfinden, aber sich schon auch gegenseitig beeinflussen. Und dadurch interessant zu beobachten sind.

Wie bist du denn eigentlich überhaupt an dieses Thema herangekommen? Eher über die Gesichtsfilter, also den digitalen Aspekt, oder über das tatsächliche Maskieren und das Ausschalten von Gesichtserkennung?

Face the Face hieß ja der Kurs an der Hochschule. Aber – und da liegt der eigentliche Anfang – Face the Face war auch der Name einer Ausstellung, die ich mit Annika Meier zusammen kuratiert habe, eine so genannte Speedshow. Die lief letztes Jahr im Herbst hier in Berlin in einem Internet-Café, und da lag der Fokus bereits auf dem Thema Facefilter. Das war inhaltlich ein Hauptaugenmerk dieser Ausstellung, fand aber gleichzeitig auch im Kontext von Netzkunst statt – die für sich genommen viel älter ist, die sich aber auch immer schon um Fragen der Identität und des Gesichtes im Zusammenspiel mit Kamera und Computer gedreht hat. Und über Aspekte wie Social Media, Net Art, Facefilter entstand dann dieser Kurs an der HAW, der ein bisschen breiter angelegt war. Da hing für mich automatisch der Bereich Gesichtserkennung mit dran. Privacy und Anonymitätsfragen im Internet, das sind genau die Themen, die sehr klassisch bei mir mitlaufen, schon seit Jahren.

Warum treibt dich Anonymität so sehr um?

Ähnlich meiner Antwort auf deine Eingangsfrage halte ich die Privatsphäre und die Anonymität, die wir in unserer Gesellschaft besitzen, für ein sehr hohes Gut. Und für eine wichtige Grundlage der Demokratie, in der wir leben. Wenn die den Bach runtergeht und wir in eine totale Überwachung geraten, dann haben wir ein riesiges Problem. Irgendwie habe ich schon immer auf dieses Thema geschaut und mich dafür interessiert. Was ist die neueste Entwicklung? Was kann man damit machen? Und wenn man das ein bisschen versteht oder sich damit auskennt, dann macht das nicht nur Spaß, sondern ermöglicht einem, etwas zu tun, das auch sozial tief eingreift. Gerade in einer Atmosphäre, in der so eine Nothing-to-hide-Haltung herrscht: Joa, ich mach’ das einfach… weil ist doch egal.

Genau, dieses ich habe doch nichts zu verbergen, was soll’s mich also kümmern?!

Ja, und an dem Punkt kann man sagen: Dann zieh’ dich doch aus, wenn du nichts zu verbergen hast, oder Gib mir mal alle deine Logins für deine Accounts! – Ja, nee, so jetzt aber auch wieder nich’. Und das Bewusstsein dafür, das ist schon fundamental wichtig. Ich glaube auch, dass in der Politik diese Zusammenhänge, dieses Für und Wider, einigen Leuten klar ist. Aber der Druck wird halt immer größer, auch und gerade bei so etwas wie der Covid-App. Der Druck aus der Industrie, aber auch aus der Politik. Für eine einseitige Form der Transparenz. Der vermeintlichen Sicherheit. Da werden bestimmte Freiheitsrechte hier und da sehr stark eingeschränkt. Und einerseits weißt du, okay, das muss jetzt so. Andererseits kannst du aber auch gar nicht mehr demonstrieren, zum Beispiel.

Inwiefern sind dann die Masken, die in dem Seminar entstanden sind, innerhalb des Projekts Face the Face, inwieweit sind die denn schon Lösungen? Oder stellen sie vielmehr einen Fingerzeig auf das Thema dar?

Ich würde sagen beides. Das Interessante daran: An der Hochschule gibt’s ja verschiedene Design-Fachrichtungen, die dort studiert werden. Und du triffst eben auch auf Leute aus der Mode, die einen ganz anderen Umgang mit Material pflegen und wie man beispielsweise etwas trägt. Ursprünglich bezieht sich die Aufgabenstellung des Seminars auf ein Projekt namens CVdazzle von Adam Harvey, das circa acht Jahre alt ist. Damals lag der Ansatz darin, sich so zu schminken und eine Frisur zu tragen, dass Kamera und Software das menschliche Gesicht nicht mehr als solches erkennen konnten. Wir haben an der Hochschule über Themen wie Privatsphäre gearbeitet, und eigentlich war das mit diesen Masken nur so ein kurzes Projekt, im Grunde eine Fingerübung. Allerdings mit der spannenden Prämisse, etwas zu kreieren, das man im Gesicht trägt, aber leicht entfernen kann. Schminke must du abschminken – das nimmt dir die Flexibilität. Aber so etwas wie eine Brille, die ich im Gesicht trage, die mich irgendwie verfremdet, die ich aber spontan wieder absetzen kann. Wie wäre das? Wie sähe das aus? Ein bisschen haben wir diese Situation ja jetzt mit den medizinischen Masken, die auf einmal von allen getragen werden. Jedenfalls sind in dem Seminar einige Sachen bei rausgekommen – manche von den Masken sind auch unsinnig oder einfach lustig. Dennoch ist das Szenario, das mit den Exponaten verknüpft ist, gleichbleibend interessant: zum einen, weil du die Maske gegen die Software in der Kamera testen musst. Und zum anderen, weil du sie gleichzeitig auch sozial testest. Wie sehe ich damit aus? Wie reagieren denn die Leute damit auf mich? Will jemand mit mir reden, wenn ich so etwas trage? Und das sind im Kern ganz wichtige Fragen. Ich fände es schon interessant, etwas in dem Bereich zu entwickeln, das meine digitale Anonymität wahrt und trotzdem socially acceptable ist. Das war so ein bisschen die Idee dahinter, und da hängen dann verschiedene Diskussionen dran. Dass wir dieses Gespräch gerade führen, das ist eigentlich das, worum es geht – als Gesellschaft die Frage der Privatsphäre zu sehen und sich darüber auszutauschen.

Wenn ich die Funktionsweise von Wearable CVdazzles richtig verstanden habe, dann helfen uns die medizinischen Gesichtsmasken unter dem Aspekt eigentlich nicht weiter, oder? Weil eigentlich, ja, was genau unkenntlich sein muss – die Augenpartie?

Ja, aber ich glaube, die medizinische Maske plus eine Sonnenbrille… also die deutsche Gesichtserkennung findet da nichts mehr. Ich finde vor allem die selbst genähten Masken und dieses ganze Bunte, was da jetzt kommt, gegenüber den chirurgisch anmutenden Masken… das ist doch total gut. Da wird so eine DIY-Welle losgetreten, und zu Hause sitzen ganz viele und nähen noch die Form oder die Form. Meine Mutter hat mir auch schon welche geschickt. Ich halte das wirklich für eine spannende Sache; mit der Kultur, die da drumherum entsteht. Da stecken durchaus auch politische Themen mit drin. Und nehmen wir mal an, dass wir uns noch auf Jahre hinaus gegen Erreger schützen müssen oder unsere Mitmenschen vor einer Ansteckung durch uns, so tut sich doch ein nicht unspannender Zwischenraum auf, in dem wir uns bewegen werden. Da können Gewohnheiten aufbrechen. Und vielleicht sogar soziale beziehungsweise zwischenmenschliche Komponenten neu ins Spiel kommen.

In dem Kurs – gab es da sozusagen eine Lieblingsmaske bei dir? Eine Maske, die du für besonders gelungen hältst?

Es gab ein paar. Manche, die zum Beispiel in der Bewegung sehr gut funktioniert haben. Mit Lametta oder Ketten vor dem Gesicht. Bei denen hatte die einfache Erkennungs-Software schon starke Probleme, einfach nur wegen der Bewegung. Ich fand aber eine bemerkenswert, die mit wenig Mitteln sehr gut abgeschnitten hat – mit den weißen Kreuzen rechts und links. Die hat nicht nur optisch sehr gut funktioniert, sondern konnte auch sozial überzeugen: Mit dem Träger war für mich als Gegenüber tatsächlich ein Gespräch möglich. Die Maske besaß so design-technische Aspekte, die genial einfach in der Umsetzung waren. Dass jemand ein alltägliches Objekt nimmt, einen Kleiderbügel aus Draht, und mit Klebeband kombiniert Erkennungs-Software austrickst… Für mich gerade auch ästhetisch eine spannende Lösung. Gut gefiel mir zudem die Variante mit dem Netz und den Kugeln vor dem Gesicht. Das wirkt schon sehr modisch und kann so in Hamburg oder in Berlin problemlos auf der Straße getragen werden. Da würde dich keiner komisch angucken, deswegen.

Ja, das sieht fast so aus, als ob es einen kulturellen Background besäße.

Genau, da finden sich verschiedene Anspielungen drin wieder, die einem irgendwie vertraut vorkommen. Auch die Fechtmaske ist ein gutes Beispiel. Die wirkt natürlich deutlich abweisender; dafür verzerrt sie aber auch das Gesicht dahinter ausgesprochen wirksam. Doch, da sind etliche interessante Richtungen eingeschlagen worden.

Danke schön, Aram, für die Einblicke in das Projekt Face the Face und deine Arbeit. Wie’s nach unserem Gespräch weitergeht: Momentan planen wir, in ein paar Tagen mit der fünften Ausgabe – “Maskerade” – live zu gehen. Für dich vielleicht auch nicht uninteressant: Eine Kollegin von mir wird sich mit einer ehemaligen Fork-Mitarbeiterin austauschen, die inzwischen im Bereich Fashion auf Instagram als Model und Fotografin aktiv ist. In dem Gespräch wird es um Aspekte wie Schminken und die verschiedenen Rollen gehen, in die sie vor der Kamera schlüpft.

Ich bin gespannt. Das heute hat Spaß gemacht – jetzt haben wir wahrscheinlich eine halbe Stunde miteinander gesprochen, deutlich länger als in meinen letzten Radio-Interviews üblich. Schön, wenn man mehr als fünf Minuten hat, um sich auf ein Thema einzulassen.

Autor
Björn Lange
23-04-2020

Tagged with: +

Jeu de Paume, Interview

May 2, 2020

L’artiste Aram Bartholl nous parle de son oeuvre “Are you human?” présentée dans l’exposition “Le supermarché des images” (11/02 – 07/06/20).
Je de Paume 2020

Tagged with: + +

Post-Digital Self. Die Kunst der modernen Maskerade

April 27, 2020


MdbK Podcast #019: LINK IN BIO, 27.4.2020

Wie werden heute im digitalen Alltag die Frage & Veränderung des Gesichtes, Gesichtserkennung und Facefilter diskutiert?
In der letzten MdbK [talk]-Folge zur Ausstellung LINK IN BIO, sprechen wir mit Aram Bartholl, Hanneke Klaver und Jeremy Bailey über „Post-Digital Self. Die Kunst der modernen Maskerade“. War die Maske seit der Ur- und Frühgeschichte ein fassbares Objekt, verschwimmen mittels digitaler Technologien die Grenzen zwischen Maske und Gesicht. Der deutsche Medienkünstler Bartholl kuratierte gemeinsam mit Anika Meier die „Speed Show“ zum Thema Post-Digital Self, in der die Geschichte der Netzkunst erzählt wird. In einem Internetcafe klickte man sich so durch Arbeiten von NetzkünstlerInnen, wie Jeremy Bailey und Hanneke Klaver, die Identitätsbildung reflektieren und auf den Gesichtsfiltertrend reagieren.

SHOWNOTES
Einleitung 0:00 (Deutsch)
Aram Bartholl 2:43 (Deutsch)
Hanneke Klaver 13:00 (English)
Jeremy Bailey 20:00 (English)
Schluss 26:21 (Deutsch)

Der Kanadier Jeremy Bailey hat in seinem Video „The Future of Television“ (2012) den digitalen Gesichtsfiltertrend gewissermaßen vorhergesehen. Er arbeitet mit einer Gesichtserkennungssoftware. Die Zukunft des Fernsehens ist für Bailey im Jahr 2012, was heute die sozialen Medien sind: Orte der Identitätsbildung.

Die Serie #freetheexpression der niederländischen Künstlerin Hanneke Klaver ist eine Reaktion auf den Gesichtsfiltertrend. Mit Strohalmen, Metalldraht, Holz, Papier und Kleber stellt Klaver analog Filter her, die sie wie Bastelbögen verteilt. Mit ihren nicht standardisierten Gesichtsfiltern befürwortet sie die freie Meinungsäußerung.

Der deutsche Medienkünstler Aram Bartholl entwickelte im Jahr 2010 ein Ausstellungsformat, das aus einem Internet Café für einen Abend einen Ausstellungsraum macht. Im Rahmen der „Speed Show“ ist auf diesen Computern Netzkunst zu sehen. Kunst, die das Internet als Medium nutzt, sich mit den genuinen Eigenschaften des Internets auseinandersetzt und die Technik thematisiert, mit der sie arbeitet. Netzkunst existiert nicht erst, seit das Internet für ein Massenpublikum zugänglich geworden ist, aber die sozialen Medien machen es einem breiteren Publikum möglich, im Alltag bewusst oder unbewusst Netzkunst zu sehen.

LINK IN BIO. Kunst nach den sozialen Medien zeigte mit über 50 Arbeiten, wie sich Produktion und Rezeption von Kunst im Zeitalter sozialer Medien verändern. Die Gruppenausstellung endete mit der temporären Schließung des MdbK. Wir konnten uns glücklicherweise noch vorher mit einigen KünstlerInnen für diese und weitere MdbK [talk]-Folgen zusammensetzen.

Königgalerie: Interview with Anika Meier

April 19, 2020

The curators Anika Meier and Johann König host a series of talks which will be broadcasted live on Instagram. The guest are experts in net art, post-internet art and digital art, and artists who are part of the upcoming exhibition series THE ARTIST IS ONLINE

Tagged with:

Face the Face – Rundgang

February 19, 2020

Student works of the class “Face the Face” on view at Rundgang Armgartstrasse, HAW Hamburg, Jan 29th – Feb 1st 2020

WiSe 2019/20 Bachelor
Kunst mit Schwerpunkt digitale Medien
Prof. ARAM BARTHOL

Das Gesicht steht im Zentrum der menschlichen Kommunikation, emotionale Ausdrücke und Grimassen finden weltweite universell übereinstimmung. Menschen sind von Natur aus darauf trainiert Gesichter besonders gut zu erkennen und sie zu erinnern. Mit einer Masken das Gesicht zu verdecken, sich unkenntlich zu machen oder in eine andere Rolle zu schlüpfen entspricht einer uralten Tradition menschlicher Kultur. Das Portrait, früher nur den Reichen als Gemälde vorbehalten wurde durch die Photographie ein Allgemeingut.

In Zeiten digitaler Kommunikation hat sich die Rolle des Gesichts und dessen Abbild noch einmal besonders verstärkt. Heute tragen fast alle Menschen ein Kamera-Smartphone mit sich herum. Soziale Netzwerke und das allgegenwärtige Selfie transferiert das ‚Ich‘ auf eine weitere Stufe der digitalen Abstraktion. Virtuelle Masken, Facetune Überbeauty und endlose Social Feeds ermöglichen ganz neue Perspektiven bei der Formung des eigenen Körpers als digitales alter Ego. Andererseits Spielt die automatisierte Erkennung von Gesichtern durch Computer und Software eine immer stärkere Rolle. Angefangen bei der Unlock-Funktion im Telefon, oder automatischer Erkennung von Freunden im Fotoalbum bis hin zu riesigen Datenbanken der Internetunternehmen und staatlichen Organe sind Fotos von Gesichtern und deren Zuordnung zu Identitäten nicht mehr wegzudenken. Zunehmende Kontrolle und Gesichtserkennung im Öffentlichen Raum sind hierbei aktuell wichtige Themen in der öffentlichen Diskussion.

Die Studierenden des Kurses Face The Face haben sich mit all diesen Themen und Fragen detailliert auseinandergesetzt. Es sind unterschiedlichste Projekte in Form von Videos, Animationen, Facefilter aber auch Skulpturen, Performance, Texte oder Photographien entstanden.

All pictures -> https://www.flickr.com/photos/bartholl/albums/72157713172070588

#BrechtDrop

February 16, 2020

As part of a discussion panel at the Brecht Haus Berlin last thursday I made a Dead Drop in the entrance hallway. Come by visit the house and drop some files!

Die kleine Intervention: Weniger Spektakel, mehr Wirkung?

Do 13.02.19:30
Installation und Gespräch
Brecht-Tage 2020, Literaturforum im Brecht-Haus

Mit Aram Bartholl und Helgard Haug (Rimini Protokoll)
Moderation Cornelius Puschke

Anhand von Aram Bartholls „Dead Drops“ (mit Live-Installation) und Projekten von Rimini Protokoll geht es um die Frage, ob die kleine, unauffällige oder parasitäre Aktionsform wirksamer ist als die skandalösen Groß-Interventionen, die ebenso schnell wieder verschwinden wie sie erschienen sind.

Tagged with: +

Wearable Dazzle – Gesichtserkennung abgeschminkt

February 14, 2020

Wearable accessories to oppose automated face recognition developed by design students of HAW Hamburg, winter semester 19/20 “Face The Face” class. ( based on Adam Harveys CV Dazzle project)

All pictures –> flickr.com/photos/bartholl/albums/72157713103071956

Radio Show:

Discussion with Anna Biseli (netzpolitik.org) at DLF radio show Kompressor about face recognition and surveillance, featuring student works of HAW Hamburg. Full article and show to listen to at –>

https://www.deutschlandfunkkultur.de/kompressor-deluxe-gesichtserkennung-abgeschminkt

„Das Interessante an Gesichtserkennung ist, oder auch das Spannende daran, zu kommunizieren, was Überwachung heißt, das verstehen alle“, sagt Bartholl. „Bei all diesen Projekten, die sich auf kreative Weise damit beschäftigen, ist das Wichtigste, dass dadurch eine Öffentlichkeit und eine Wahrnehmung stattfindet, dass diese Themen total wichtig sind. Es geht darum, die Diskussion am Laufen zu halten und zu überlegen als Gesellschaft: Wollen wir das oder wollen wir das nicht?“

Best Friends Forever

January 11, 2020

found on Invalidenstr. Berlin

Why Berlin, Why? ;)

January 7, 2020

https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-berlin-artists-transforming-trash-sculpture

Tagged with: