Current Events

Olympics x Art

25. September – 10. October 2020
Group Show, Co Gallery, Paris

Faster? Higher? Stronger?

This group show explores aesthetic and mentalities related to sports: to go beyond your limits, to feel part of a community, to be tied to a territory and to try to take care of it as we are taking care of ourselves. Marketing, major brands and sponsors of the Olympics induce us to think that sports are also a way of life: adapt your style, improve your fitness, optimize your performance, transform your body.

In times of mass circulation of images, these injunctions influence our canons of beauty and our behaviour, leading to obsession with self-optimization, driving us to be always more competitive and more productive. But this year, the Olympics have been postponed; no competition, time out.
So: Faster? Higher? Stronger?*

curated by Alexis Loisel-Montambaux
conceived by Victor Le de Doisy & Jonathan Schurdevin

The Sea Is Glowing

21. August – 1. November 2020
Group Show, Exportdrvo, Rijeka

An international group exhibition which deals with the invisible economics linked to the sea. With their works, world-respected artists deal with unusual and radical phenomena, from strange online shops to the empires of amateur pornography and other golden coasts.

In the geographical sense, Europe is a maritime continent: considering the ratio of the length of the coast to the total land surface, Europe has more contact with the sea than any other continent. For Rijeka, the port, as well as the sea, is not only a place of loading and unloading or the arrivals and departures of boats. The port is the heart of the city and symbolically important for the identity of the city. This is why the sea, i.e. new forms of work and economy which are connected to the sea, is extremely important for both Rijeka and Europe.

The Sea is Glowing exhibition focuses primarily on new invisible economies that are inextricably linked to the sea, such as the exploration of oil and ores in the depths of the sea, the establishment of offshore tax havens on the coasts and the launch of libertarian start-ups in self-sufficient colonies which float in international waters. All of the mentioned activities are part of the new economies which include new forms of work (such as care and welfare) or new forms of capital circulation (such as free ports). Considering the (occasional) specificity of their tax models, port cities such as Rijeka are very important for such types of economies. The exhibition brings together the works of artists who investigate unusual Amazon shops, the increasingly present outsourcing of healthcare, “the black chimneys” and deep-sea mining, the hidden offshore havens, the dark empires of amateur pornography and other golden coasts.

The curator of the exhibition is Inke Arns (DE), famous for her work in media art. She is the artistic director of the Dortmund Hartware MedienKunstVerein (HMKV) organisation and the curator of numerous international exhibitions that have been shown around Europe and the world – from Berlin, Glasgow and Warsaw, from Ljubljana and Nova Sad, all the way to Moscow, Tel Aviv and Hong Kong.

?>

Upcoming Events

A Brief Inquiry Into Empty Space

3. – 7. October 2020
Group Show, ZhdK, Zurich

ArtTech Talk: Technology Off Screen

27. September 2020
Talk, Vienna Contemporary, Vienna

Sunday, 27 September 2020, 1:30-2:30 pm

ArtTech Talk: Technology Off Screen

Artists are increasingly using new techniques and materials that address our relationship to a technological world. Artist Aleksandra Domanovic emerged with work that directly addressed a screen context with her collaborative project vvork.com before establishing a largely sculptural practice that incorporates 3D printing and ideas around the use of technology and biological innovations. Aram Bartholl is a Berlin-based conceptual artist whose work unpicks the digital and the physical in inventive ways.

Speakers:
Aleksandra Domanovic, artist
Aram Bartholl, artist
Moderated by Francesca Gavin, art theorist, curator and writer

Recent Events

The Days Are Just Packed

18. – 20. September 2020
Group Show, THE POOL, Istanbul

THE POOL is a new artist run initiative organized by Ece Cangüden and Marian Luft.
Our aim is to speculate, develop and display new dynamic, collaborative, interdisciplinary
aesthetics and attitudes. THE POOL is meant to function as an independent and
international platform for exhibitions, research and residency.

THE POOL is based in Heybeliada, an island in Istanbul, Turkey. The place itself is an old
villa with a huge abandoned property including an old pool which will function as the main
exhibition space. It has a beautiful view to the asian skyline of Istanbul. Wild horses hanging
out of the property.

EC(centri)CITY – Die exzentrische Stadt

10. September 2020
Talk, Akademie der Künste, Berlin

urbainable – stadthaltig
EC(centri)CITY – Die exzentrische Stadt

Gespräche, Filme, Performance, Installation

Das von Nadim Samman (KUNSTWERKE BERLIN e.V.) kuratierte Veranstaltungsprogramm lädt bildende Künstler*innen, Architekt*innen und Wissenschaftler*innen ein, über die europäische Stadt des 21. Jahrhunderts als Kompressor und Zentrifuge für die bildenden Künste zu diskutieren. Mit Audiobeiträgen, Podiumsgesprächen und einem ausgewählten Filmprogramm reagieren die Akteure auf Themen der Ausstellung „urbainable – stadthaltig“. Sie weiten das Spektrum hin zu Schnittstellen der bildenden Kunst und zeigen Visionen für ein neues – globales – städtisches Leben.

Talks: 16 Uhr: Die letzte Schritt: Mikromobilität, Städte & Privatisierung

Globale Startups haben in den letzten Monaten europäische Städte mit Leihfahrrädern und -E-Scootern überschwemmt. Da Fußwege zunehmend von parkenden Fahrzeugen eingenommen werden, entschließen sich einige Bürger dazu, ihrer Frustration durch Vandalismus-Aktionen Luft zu machen und entsorgen die Leihgeräte. In der Tat ist diese Form von Zerstörung und Verlust ein durchaus kalkulierter Teil dieses Geschäftsmodells mit de Ausleihe.

Kann diese Form von alternativen, nicht nachhaltigen Transportmodellen die städtische Verkehrslösung der Zukunft sein? Was kommt als nächstes? Wie verhalten sich diese Modelle zu unserem Verständnis vom öffentlichen Raum? Welche Debatten müssen über den öffentlichen Raum und dessen Wandlung geführt werden?

Mit Regine Keller (Landschaftsarchitektin), Aram Bartholl (Künstler), Ludwig Engel (Futurist), Peter Haimerl (Architekt)

Tap To Edit

10. – 14. September 2020
Group Show, Renk Rosenblat Alexa, Berlin

TAP TO EDIT

The exhibition Tap to Edit draws on a postmodern reality in which the pursuit of absolute freedom has shaped an omnipresence of powerlessness and exhaustion; Tap to Edit is both an exploration of and a search for some of the many ways ‚in‘ and ‚out‘ of todays static relationship between society and the self. In an array of works displayed over white cube, dark room and outside areas, symptoms of neoliberal ideals are set to juxtapose the individuals abilities in proposing change for such system itself.

VALERIA ABENDROTH
ARAM BARTHOLL
DISTRIBUTED GALLERY
MHER BRUTYAN
OLIVIA WALSH
DANIELLE ORCHARD
ERIC WINKLER
LUCIA BERLANGA
SOPHIA KELLY – KEEGAN
ALEXANDER GNÄDINGER

11 – 14 SEPT 2020
OPENING 10 SEPT 2020 — 6 PM
MARIENBURGER STR . 18/19
10457 BERLIN

Better Off Online

9. – 13. September 2020
Group Show, KÖNIG GALERIE / KÖNIG DIGITAL, Online

#KönigDigital: The international group show „better off online“ is presented by @koeniggalerie as part of @arselectronica. Enter the exhibition by typing ars.webb.game in your browser.

“It is increasingly necessary to be able to think new technologies in different ways, and to be critical of them, in order to meaningfully participate in that shaping and directing“, writes James Bridle in his book “New Dark Age. Technology and the End of Future“. During the lockdown nearly everything that was left for the art world to connect, share and experience were digital devices and new technologies. The digital boom was hit by a wave of criticism of technology. Artists have always worked with new technologies, and at the same time critically question them.

Experiencing a global lockdown is an excuse for utopian escapism into a game environment as the only place left to experience and interact with art. The British artist Thomas @Webb built a virtual world for new media artists to share their thoughts on what technology is and could be.

The WORLD WIDE WEBB is a virtual world the digital visitor enters through the browser on a smartphone. It is a multiplayer video game, a digital exhibition space and a world full of art and characters the visitor is invited to interact with. Webb recreates the social spontaneity of the world pre-Covid-19. Net art is presented in its genuine medium, the digital realm, where video art is also easily accessible. The visitor meets AI avatars designed by Webb, to reflect the human nature and to question the use of technology in the digital age.

Artists: Koo Jeong A, Aram Bartholl, Alice Bucknell, Arvida Byström, Stine Deja, Keiken, Kesh, Jonas Lund, Rachel Maclean, Tabor Robak, Manuel Rossner, Nicole Ruggiero, Sebastian Schmieg, Thomas Webb

Concept: Anika Meier & Thomas Webb

Blog

SWR2 Interview – Unlock Life

August 26, 2020

 

FOSSILIEN DES SPÄTKAPITALISMUS
Aram Bartholl präsentiert weggeworfene E-Scooter als Kunstwerke

Seit einem guten Jahr sind E-Scooter auf deutschen Straßen zugelassen – seitdem überschwemmen Leihroller unsere Innenstädte. Die einen sehen in ihnen ein hippes Fortbewegungsmittel, die anderen ein Ärgernis. Für den Künstler Aram Bartholl sind sie Material. Er stellt sie als Readymades aus oder baut aus ihnen Skulpturen – zuletzt im Kunstraum Kreuzberg in Berlin. Oliver Kranz hat in dort getroffen.

Die E-Scooter, die Aram Bartholl verwendet, sind mit einer dicken Schlammschicht überzogen. Auf einigen haben sich kleine Muscheln festgesetzt. Bis vor Kurzem lagen sie in einem Berliner Kanal

AB
Man sieht die sehr gut auf dem Grund liegen, wenn man da eine Weile kuckt. Ich habe jetzt fünf Roller und zwei oder drei Räder dort rausgezogen. Das ist schon wie eine Performance für sich selber.

Aram Bartholl hat Fotos der Bergungsaktion ins Internet gestellt. Obwohl die E-Scooter höchstens ein Jahr im Wasser lagen, sehen sie wie antike Artefakte aus.

AB
Ich habe sie einfach so trocknen lassen und als Objets trouvés, als Readymade, ausgestellt in diesem Kunstraum Kreuzberg. Sie haben eine ganz andere Ausstrahlung, hinterfragen auch sehr schön diese ganze Business-Logik…

Aram Bartholl meint die Logik, nach der es sich lohnt, tausende E-Scooter in Innenstädte zu bringen, in der Hoffnung, dass sich die Menschen daran gewöhnen und sie regelmäßig nutzen.

AB
Das Geld ist quasi schon abgeschrieben, wenn diese Objekte angeschafft werden. Die kosten natürlich alle ziemlich viel Geld mit den Batterien und der ganzen Technik, aber es wird sehr sorglos auch von den Firmen damit umgegangen. Und dementsprechend auch von den Menschen in der Stadt, weil sie natürlich ein Ärgernis sind, wenn sie im Weg stehen usw. Und dementsprechend auch Ziel werden von Vandalismus.

Die E-Scooter, die vor einem Jahr noch als Vorboten einer neuen, umweltfreundlichen Mobilität galten, werden heute eher kritisch gesehen. Die Hoffnung, dass viele Menschen vom Auto auf öffentliche Verkehrsmittel umsteigen, weil sie die letzte Meile mit E-Scootern zurücklegen können, hat sich nicht erfüllt. Das ungute Gefühl, dass der knappe öffentliche Raum durch das Aufstellen all der Scooter und Leihfahrräder noch knapper wird, aber bleibt. – Aram Bartholl interessiert sich für die Gefährte auch deshalb, weil sie mit dem Internet verbunden sind. Jede Verleihfirma hat eine App…

AB
Ich beobachte schon lange das Internet und wie sich die Dinge mit dem realen Leben verquicken. … Und heute sind das natürlich alltägliche Themen, die auch in der Politik riesige Auswirkungen haben. Wir haben ja so einen durchgedrehten Präsidenten in den USA, wenn der auf Twitter irgendetwas schreibt, dann gehen die Börsenkurse rauf und runter. Also das Spiel des Digitalen hat sich voll entfaltet, kann man sagen. Die Trennung „das ist analog, das ist digital“ funktioniert nicht mehr, weil alles zusammenhängt.

Bei den E-Scootern, die Aram Bartholl aus dem Kanal gezogen hat, ist die Verbindung zum Internet vermutlich gekappt – aber als Symbol funktionieren sie immer noch. „Fossilien des Spätkapitalismus“ nennt sie der Künstler. Gerade noch lagen sie als Schrott im Wasser, nun sind sie Kunst…

AB
Die werden zu sehen sein auf der Berlin Art Week in der Akademie der Künste. Und dort gibt es eine Diskussion: „Die letzte Meile“, die verschiedene Themen in der Richtung anspricht. … Es gibt auch nächste Woche eine Ausstellung in Kroatien in der Kulturhauptstadt Rijeka. Da werden auch Roller und Fahrräder zu sehen sein.

Denn als schlammbedeckte Fossilien sind die Gefährte sehr beliebt. Aram Bartholl wird noch viele Readymades aus ihnen bauen…

Oliver Kranz über Aram Bartholl, der Skulpturen aus weggeworfenen E-Scootern und Leihfahrrädern baut. Wer nach Rijeka fahren möchte – dort sind sie ab morgen zu sehen. In der Akademie der Künste in Berlin am 10. September…

SWR2 Journal am Morgen
Sendung am: 20.8.2020
Autor: Oliver Kranz

Tagged with:

Fossilien des Spätkapitalismus – Monopol

July 18, 2020

Aram Bartholl has salvaged rental bikes and scooters from the Spree River—and is now exhibiting them as material relics of the platform economy in Berlin

It takes a second to recognise these two-wheeled artefacts for what they really are: electric scooters and cheap rental bikes that are usually scattered around the city, their poisonous colours vying for our attention. The greenish layer of mud and algae coating them gives them the look of historical relics. Currently on view in the Journey into a Living Being exhibition at Kunstraum Kreuzberg/Bethanien, they could almost be objects from a fictional history, treasures recovered from Damien Hirst’s 2017 Wreck of the Unbelievable.

They have, in fact, merely been fished out of the Spree after being thrown in by people in a destructive rage. Perhaps out of frustration with the uncomfortable rickety wheels, or anger at how invasive the electric scooters have become, spreading through the city on a pretext of more environmentally friendly transportation. Artist Aram Bartholl has dredged them up again. In the brightly lit exhibition space, the bikes and scooters, now home to innumerable small crabs and worms, reveal themselves to be material outgrowths of platform capitalism dominated by web providers like Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon.
Calculated destruction.

The scores of scooter and bicycle suppliers in major international cities are currently faced with tough competition. Damage to the stock, which is treated with so much less care than private possessions, kicked, broken, thrown into rivers and canals, is factored into turnover calculations. The e-scooters in particular, with their resource-intensive lithium-ion batteries, lay bare the fact that sustainable, shared private transport turns out to have been an empty promise. Digital capitalism also produces huge piles of rubbish.

As a post-internet artist, Bartholl explores how the logic of the internet and the new economy is changing consumer behaviour and self-perception, and deconstructing our concept of privacy. Bicycles from companies like Nextbike, Mobike, and Lidl were featured in Bartholl’s 2017 work Your parcel has been delivered (to your neighbour). At that time, he collected them from public areas around the city, stacking them into a huge pile to create a sculpture in the private space of a gallery.

Article in german at ->

https://www.monopol-magazin.de/aram-bartholl-fossilien-des-spaetkapitalismus

Tagged with: +

Crossing Property Lines

July 18, 2020

Prof. Agnes Förster and Martin Bangratz from Urban planing RWTH Aachen invited me to their podcast series “Whats Next“. Below their article accompanying the conversation in German. Thx!!

 https://www.planung-neu-denken.de/podcasts/crossing-property-lines/

Crossing Property Lines

The relatively soft lockdown in Germany has forced innovation on many firms and schools, revealing the country’s shortcomings in the area of digital transformation, such as broadband access. While some of Aram Bartholl’s friends in the arts and programming scene notice hardly any difference in their routines, other, less digitalized professions have been hit hard. For Mr. Bartholl himself, teaching online has turned out to be a challenge. But what struck him most was the temporary absence of urban public space as a platform for expression. It feels liberating to see large demonstrations back in the city, both for noble and questionable causes.

Aram Bartholl’s work has dealt with digital space since his thesis in architectural studies in 2001. Back then he started with simple interventions – taking boxes from computer games and placing them in the city. He was looking at games such as first-person shooters, where the knowledge of a virtual space is crucial to the gameplay. And he found himself wondering: what does it mean to place objects from a digital realm into physical space? Do the spaces merge, or do they still belong to separate worlds?

This dualism of what is analogue and what is digital is so intertwined these days, that we are unable to distinguish one from the other. […] Of course, everything that happens there is real, it has an effect on our lives. Aram Bartholl 06/2020

A number of techno-social upheavals of our lifetime have influenced Bartholl’s work, as he observes the permeation of digital technology. The first disillusionment around 2000, when the dotcom bubble burst, the introduction of smartphones in 2007, the rise of global Internet corporations. Aram Bartholl has followed these trends closely and is still astonished by the dynamics of these tools which are so inscribed in our society; a tweet by the American president may cause immediate reactions in the stock market or foreign relations. The effects of technological developments are also becoming increasingly manifest in our cities. An early example were delivery services that visibly affect urban logistics and business closures. More recently, electric scooters and bicycles have turned up in cities worldwide – demanding our attention with a colorful design reminiscent of animated icons back in a web 2.0 era. They are objects that seem to bring the promise of a trendy internet startup into urban space, Silicon Valley Solutionism arriving in cities around the globe. Unsurprisingly, their promise of a shift towards sustainable mobility has yet to occur, as that would require political guidance and many other factors to align.

Urban space has always been a native ground for Bartholl’s work. To him, it is more exciting than the white cube with its preconceived notions and expectations about art. Outside, the audience is random and may start a discourse that would never happen in a controlled artistic environment. To encourage people to think critically about the relationship of private property and public space, Aram Bartholl recently took rental bikes from the street to exhibit them as sculptures in a gallery. Visitors were still free to rent the bikes and take them back outside, but the project challenged people’s notions of ownership, of public and private space. In a follow-up project, Bartholl is fishing algae-covered electric scooters out of Berlin’s channels to display at Kunstraum Kreuzberg, showing once again that their promise of sustainability doesn’t hold water.

We are currently experiencing social media and the internet profoundly as a public space for discussion – in contrast to urban space – even though these platforms are run by private firms, with all the problems this entails. Aram Bartholl 06/2020

Just as private objects start to clog up public space, the digital space we perceive as public space is in fact in the hands of private corporations. Inoffensive mottos and ludic logotypes suggest harmlessness, but these firms are ultimately listed and profit-oriented. This seems problematic considering the history of privatization of other public infrastructures. Europe is hard-pressed to develop independent digital infrastructures.

In 2010, Aram Bartholl began a project that has since turned into a global movement: Dead Drops are flash drives embedded in a wall so that only the USB connector sticks out. Not connected to the internet, they constitute a statement against censorship and about the relationship between our new, digital reality, and the brick and mortar of cities. New Dead Drops still pop up, over 2.500 are currently listed globally [link: deaddrops.com]. Sharing things digitally through concepts such as open source and creative commons has led to unprecedented levels of collective production and consumption of content. Movements such as Fridays For Future or Black Lives Matter would not have been possible without the viral effects of social networks. In another recent example, the German hacker and programming community has pushed the government to adopt an open-source approach to their COVID19 tracking app.

Data should be free, Bartholl agrees, yet he urges us to consider what could happen with our data in the future. If research institutions are using photos found online to train artificial intelligence models that may ultimately be used for military purposes, it raises questions about the merit of uploading billions of images each day. And movements such as the alt-right have been quick to adopt internet and meme culture and learned to improve their own false-flag tactics.

Aram Bartholl continues his investigation of technology and space. Given the current discussion around the removal of outmoded monuments, he tinkers with augmented reality to attach digital artefacts to sculptures. And, referencing the hashtag #natureishealing, he announces that he will be fishing for more discarded bicycles in the river Spree.

Aram Bartholl is a Berlin based concept artist who investigates the relationship between digital and physical space. Since 2019, Bartholl teaches art with a focus on digital media as a professor at Hamburg University of Applied Sciences.

Tagged with:

Radio Spätkauf: Interview

June 29, 2020

This mini episode features Daniel Stern interviewing artist Aram Barthall about his recent installation “Unlock Life” which utilizes remnants of the recent bike share boom.

Find out more about at Aram Bartholl at https://arambartholl.com and see the exhibit until the 16th of August at https://www.kunstraumkreuzberg.de.

http://www.radiospaetkauf.com/2020/06/rs-mini-unlock-life/

Tagged with: +

Interview: Face the Face

May 15, 2020

Face the Face
Ein Gespräch mit Prof. Aram Bartholl über Maskierung im öffentlichen Raum.

Autor, Björn Lange, 23-04-2020
https://magazine.fork.de/masquerade/face-the-face

Dieses Gespräch kam eher durch Zufall zustande: Nachdem das Thema für die fünfte Ausgabe des Unstable Mag feststand, hörte ich im Radio einen Beitrag über ein Seminar an der Hochschule für Angewandte Wissenschaften Hamburg (HAW Hamburg) – Face the Face. Bei dem Projekt unter der Leitung von Prof. Aram Bartholl stand unter anderem Gesichtserkennung im Fokus, sowie die analogen Möglichkeiten, sich digital unkenntlich zu machen. Spontan nahm ich im Februar Kontakt auf, und nun, Mitte April, gelang uns endlich das persönliche Treffen, face to face, per Hangout…

Hallo Aram, schön, dass das unter den aktuellen Umständen doch irgendwie mit unserem Gespräch geklappt hat! Ich will gar nicht lange drumrum reden – Fork und das Unstable Mag hatte ich dir ja schon kurz erläutert. Lass uns also direkt einsteigen… Warum überhaupt dieser Ansatz, Gesichtserkennungssoftware umgehen zu wollen? Müssen wir uns verstecken heutzutage?

Gute Frage. Es gibt da unterschiedlichste Meinungen zu. Gerade heute, in Zeiten von Covid-19-App, Tracking, Tracing, Handy-Bewegungsprofilen und so weiter ist das Thema Anonymität für uns als Gesellschaft schon sehr wichtig. Theoretisch wissen wir auch – also viele jedenfalls –, dass unsere Privatsphäre durchaus gefährdet ist, durch große digitale Firmen wie Facebook, Google, Microsoft. Unternehmen, die ohne Ende Daten sammeln. Bloß spüren wir das natürlich nicht. Das eigene Gesicht aber, das ist etwas, das wir alle verstehen: Häh, da ist ein Foto von mir!? Ich glaube, das Gesicht und die Erkennung des Gesichtes und die Diskussion darum ist ein wertvoller Einstieg, um über Privatsphäre zu reden. Ah, ja, es gibt da dieses Clear View, und die haben zwei Milliarden, drei Milliarden Bilder gesammelt von allen Menschen auf der Welt, und jeder kann darauf zugreifen… Äh, das geht doch nicht! Das verstößt doch gegen diese Datenschutzgrundverordnung. Und das verstehen auch Leute, die normalerweise keinen technischen Zugang haben. Und dann kann man auch über Daten im Browser reden und über Cookies und über Tracking-Pixel. Also über Dinge, die viel abstrakter sind und die man nur schwer vermitteln kann.

Lustigerweise haben Leute etwas wie das Gesicht aber gar nicht so sehr auf dem Schirm, oder? Wenn ich da an mein persönliches Umfeld denke – da ist vielen plausibel, dass wenn sie online ihre Daten eingeben, händisch, also Adresse, Geburtsdatum, das übliche, dass sie da bewusster reflektieren, dass Sie gerade Daten Preis geben, als sie es mit ihrem eigenen Gesicht verbinden.

Ja, ich glaube, zu einem gewissen Punkt haben wir uns daran gewöhnt, irgendwie, dass diese Datenfreigabe dazugehört. Ich weiß es nicht genau. Gleichzeitig kann man nun – und das ist so’n bisschen eine andere Diskussion – bei diesem Masken Tragen, den medizinischen Masken, meine ich, eine Form von… ja, Vorbehalt gegenüber der Anonymität beobachten. Hier in Deutschland, da wollen die Leute das nicht so richtig, oder? Am Anfang ist man ganz komisch angeguckt worden im Supermarkt. Jetzt wird es dann doch wahrscheinlich Pflicht, demnächst.

Interessant, dass du das ansprichst. Das wäre sonst eine meiner späteren Fragen gewesen. Mein Eindruck, im Moment, wenn ich einkaufen gehe, ist schon, dass ich mich komisch fühle, weil ich noch keine Maske trage. Also, bei uns hier in Hamburg-Eimsbüttel. Die Quote an getragenen Masken im Supermarkt ist irre hoch, und da hab ich mich schon gefragt, ob sowas wie die aktuelle gesundheitliche Krise als eine Art Türöffner für den Mainstream wirken könnte. Ob wir uns jetzt gerade alle daran gewöhnen, dass Maske eine Option ist?

Ja, genau. Das ist auch eine der interessanten Fragestellungen – ob sich durch diese Corona-Krise entsprechende Dinge, Wahrnehmungen, verändern. Genauso, wie sich derzeit auch vieles in der Kommunikation verändert und ins Digitale verschiebt. Womit wir wieder zu der Gesichtserkennungsdiskussion kommen: Vielleicht ist es demnächst so, dass wir wissen, wir sind online irgendwie “nackt”, aber draußen dann immer voll verschleiert. Der ehemals öffentliche Raum, wird das jetzt ein voll anonymer Raum? Dann gehen wir nach Hause und sind auf Chatroulette wieder nackt, sozusagen. Wird das so eine komische Verkehrung? Und was ich mich auch gefragt habe: Es gibt ja vieles im Bereich der Snapchat- und Instagram-Filter; das ist ja eine Kultur, die jetzt schon eine Weile läuft und auch interessante Ausprägungen besitzt – nicht nur Hundeschnauze, Katzennase oder so. Gerade im asiatischen Raum findet man Video-Streamer und YouTuber, die immer nur mit Avatar auftreten. Bei denen man gar nicht weiß, wie die aussehen, weil die komplett eine Maske auf haben.

Eine digitale oder eine echte?

Eine digitale – Personen, die immer irgendwie was im Gesicht haben oder auch komplett digital verfremdet sind, so dass du gar nicht weißt, wer das ist. Das sind Beispiele für verschiedene Richtungen der Maskierungen. Die gleichzeitig, nebeneinander in unterschiedlichen Kontexten stattfinden, aber sich schon auch gegenseitig beeinflussen. Und dadurch interessant zu beobachten sind.

Wie bist du denn eigentlich überhaupt an dieses Thema herangekommen? Eher über die Gesichtsfilter, also den digitalen Aspekt, oder über das tatsächliche Maskieren und das Ausschalten von Gesichtserkennung?

Face the Face hieß ja der Kurs an der Hochschule. Aber – und da liegt der eigentliche Anfang – Face the Face war auch der Name einer Ausstellung, die ich mit Annika Meier zusammen kuratiert habe, eine so genannte Speedshow. Die lief letztes Jahr im Herbst hier in Berlin in einem Internet-Café, und da lag der Fokus bereits auf dem Thema Facefilter. Das war inhaltlich ein Hauptaugenmerk dieser Ausstellung, fand aber gleichzeitig auch im Kontext von Netzkunst statt – die für sich genommen viel älter ist, die sich aber auch immer schon um Fragen der Identität und des Gesichtes im Zusammenspiel mit Kamera und Computer gedreht hat. Und über Aspekte wie Social Media, Net Art, Facefilter entstand dann dieser Kurs an der HAW, der ein bisschen breiter angelegt war. Da hing für mich automatisch der Bereich Gesichtserkennung mit dran. Privacy und Anonymitätsfragen im Internet, das sind genau die Themen, die sehr klassisch bei mir mitlaufen, schon seit Jahren.

Warum treibt dich Anonymität so sehr um?

Ähnlich meiner Antwort auf deine Eingangsfrage halte ich die Privatsphäre und die Anonymität, die wir in unserer Gesellschaft besitzen, für ein sehr hohes Gut. Und für eine wichtige Grundlage der Demokratie, in der wir leben. Wenn die den Bach runtergeht und wir in eine totale Überwachung geraten, dann haben wir ein riesiges Problem. Irgendwie habe ich schon immer auf dieses Thema geschaut und mich dafür interessiert. Was ist die neueste Entwicklung? Was kann man damit machen? Und wenn man das ein bisschen versteht oder sich damit auskennt, dann macht das nicht nur Spaß, sondern ermöglicht einem, etwas zu tun, das auch sozial tief eingreift. Gerade in einer Atmosphäre, in der so eine Nothing-to-hide-Haltung herrscht: Joa, ich mach’ das einfach… weil ist doch egal.

Genau, dieses ich habe doch nichts zu verbergen, was soll’s mich also kümmern?!

Ja, und an dem Punkt kann man sagen: Dann zieh’ dich doch aus, wenn du nichts zu verbergen hast, oder Gib mir mal alle deine Logins für deine Accounts! – Ja, nee, so jetzt aber auch wieder nich’. Und das Bewusstsein dafür, das ist schon fundamental wichtig. Ich glaube auch, dass in der Politik diese Zusammenhänge, dieses Für und Wider, einigen Leuten klar ist. Aber der Druck wird halt immer größer, auch und gerade bei so etwas wie der Covid-App. Der Druck aus der Industrie, aber auch aus der Politik. Für eine einseitige Form der Transparenz. Der vermeintlichen Sicherheit. Da werden bestimmte Freiheitsrechte hier und da sehr stark eingeschränkt. Und einerseits weißt du, okay, das muss jetzt so. Andererseits kannst du aber auch gar nicht mehr demonstrieren, zum Beispiel.

Inwiefern sind dann die Masken, die in dem Seminar entstanden sind, innerhalb des Projekts Face the Face, inwieweit sind die denn schon Lösungen? Oder stellen sie vielmehr einen Fingerzeig auf das Thema dar?

Ich würde sagen beides. Das Interessante daran: An der Hochschule gibt’s ja verschiedene Design-Fachrichtungen, die dort studiert werden. Und du triffst eben auch auf Leute aus der Mode, die einen ganz anderen Umgang mit Material pflegen und wie man beispielsweise etwas trägt. Ursprünglich bezieht sich die Aufgabenstellung des Seminars auf ein Projekt namens CVdazzle von Adam Harvey, das circa acht Jahre alt ist. Damals lag der Ansatz darin, sich so zu schminken und eine Frisur zu tragen, dass Kamera und Software das menschliche Gesicht nicht mehr als solches erkennen konnten. Wir haben an der Hochschule über Themen wie Privatsphäre gearbeitet, und eigentlich war das mit diesen Masken nur so ein kurzes Projekt, im Grunde eine Fingerübung. Allerdings mit der spannenden Prämisse, etwas zu kreieren, das man im Gesicht trägt, aber leicht entfernen kann. Schminke must du abschminken – das nimmt dir die Flexibilität. Aber so etwas wie eine Brille, die ich im Gesicht trage, die mich irgendwie verfremdet, die ich aber spontan wieder absetzen kann. Wie wäre das? Wie sähe das aus? Ein bisschen haben wir diese Situation ja jetzt mit den medizinischen Masken, die auf einmal von allen getragen werden. Jedenfalls sind in dem Seminar einige Sachen bei rausgekommen – manche von den Masken sind auch unsinnig oder einfach lustig. Dennoch ist das Szenario, das mit den Exponaten verknüpft ist, gleichbleibend interessant: zum einen, weil du die Maske gegen die Software in der Kamera testen musst. Und zum anderen, weil du sie gleichzeitig auch sozial testest. Wie sehe ich damit aus? Wie reagieren denn die Leute damit auf mich? Will jemand mit mir reden, wenn ich so etwas trage? Und das sind im Kern ganz wichtige Fragen. Ich fände es schon interessant, etwas in dem Bereich zu entwickeln, das meine digitale Anonymität wahrt und trotzdem socially acceptable ist. Das war so ein bisschen die Idee dahinter, und da hängen dann verschiedene Diskussionen dran. Dass wir dieses Gespräch gerade führen, das ist eigentlich das, worum es geht – als Gesellschaft die Frage der Privatsphäre zu sehen und sich darüber auszutauschen.

Wenn ich die Funktionsweise von Wearable CVdazzles richtig verstanden habe, dann helfen uns die medizinischen Gesichtsmasken unter dem Aspekt eigentlich nicht weiter, oder? Weil eigentlich, ja, was genau unkenntlich sein muss – die Augenpartie?

Ja, aber ich glaube, die medizinische Maske plus eine Sonnenbrille… also die deutsche Gesichtserkennung findet da nichts mehr. Ich finde vor allem die selbst genähten Masken und dieses ganze Bunte, was da jetzt kommt, gegenüber den chirurgisch anmutenden Masken… das ist doch total gut. Da wird so eine DIY-Welle losgetreten, und zu Hause sitzen ganz viele und nähen noch die Form oder die Form. Meine Mutter hat mir auch schon welche geschickt. Ich halte das wirklich für eine spannende Sache; mit der Kultur, die da drumherum entsteht. Da stecken durchaus auch politische Themen mit drin. Und nehmen wir mal an, dass wir uns noch auf Jahre hinaus gegen Erreger schützen müssen oder unsere Mitmenschen vor einer Ansteckung durch uns, so tut sich doch ein nicht unspannender Zwischenraum auf, in dem wir uns bewegen werden. Da können Gewohnheiten aufbrechen. Und vielleicht sogar soziale beziehungsweise zwischenmenschliche Komponenten neu ins Spiel kommen.

In dem Kurs – gab es da sozusagen eine Lieblingsmaske bei dir? Eine Maske, die du für besonders gelungen hältst?

Es gab ein paar. Manche, die zum Beispiel in der Bewegung sehr gut funktioniert haben. Mit Lametta oder Ketten vor dem Gesicht. Bei denen hatte die einfache Erkennungs-Software schon starke Probleme, einfach nur wegen der Bewegung. Ich fand aber eine bemerkenswert, die mit wenig Mitteln sehr gut abgeschnitten hat – mit den weißen Kreuzen rechts und links. Die hat nicht nur optisch sehr gut funktioniert, sondern konnte auch sozial überzeugen: Mit dem Träger war für mich als Gegenüber tatsächlich ein Gespräch möglich. Die Maske besaß so design-technische Aspekte, die genial einfach in der Umsetzung waren. Dass jemand ein alltägliches Objekt nimmt, einen Kleiderbügel aus Draht, und mit Klebeband kombiniert Erkennungs-Software austrickst… Für mich gerade auch ästhetisch eine spannende Lösung. Gut gefiel mir zudem die Variante mit dem Netz und den Kugeln vor dem Gesicht. Das wirkt schon sehr modisch und kann so in Hamburg oder in Berlin problemlos auf der Straße getragen werden. Da würde dich keiner komisch angucken, deswegen.

Ja, das sieht fast so aus, als ob es einen kulturellen Background besäße.

Genau, da finden sich verschiedene Anspielungen drin wieder, die einem irgendwie vertraut vorkommen. Auch die Fechtmaske ist ein gutes Beispiel. Die wirkt natürlich deutlich abweisender; dafür verzerrt sie aber auch das Gesicht dahinter ausgesprochen wirksam. Doch, da sind etliche interessante Richtungen eingeschlagen worden.

Danke schön, Aram, für die Einblicke in das Projekt Face the Face und deine Arbeit. Wie’s nach unserem Gespräch weitergeht: Momentan planen wir, in ein paar Tagen mit der fünften Ausgabe – “Maskerade” – live zu gehen. Für dich vielleicht auch nicht uninteressant: Eine Kollegin von mir wird sich mit einer ehemaligen Fork-Mitarbeiterin austauschen, die inzwischen im Bereich Fashion auf Instagram als Model und Fotografin aktiv ist. In dem Gespräch wird es um Aspekte wie Schminken und die verschiedenen Rollen gehen, in die sie vor der Kamera schlüpft.

Ich bin gespannt. Das heute hat Spaß gemacht – jetzt haben wir wahrscheinlich eine halbe Stunde miteinander gesprochen, deutlich länger als in meinen letzten Radio-Interviews üblich. Schön, wenn man mehr als fünf Minuten hat, um sich auf ein Thema einzulassen.

Autor
Björn Lange
23-04-2020

Tagged with: +

Jeu de Paume, Interview

May 2, 2020

L’artiste Aram Bartholl nous parle de son oeuvre “Are you human?” présentée dans l’exposition “Le supermarché des images” (11/02 – 07/06/20).
Je de Paume 2020

Tagged with: + +

Post-Digital Self. Die Kunst der modernen Maskerade

April 27, 2020


MdbK Podcast #019: LINK IN BIO, 27.4.2020

Wie werden heute im digitalen Alltag die Frage & Veränderung des Gesichtes, Gesichtserkennung und Facefilter diskutiert?
In der letzten MdbK [talk]-Folge zur Ausstellung LINK IN BIO, sprechen wir mit Aram Bartholl, Hanneke Klaver und Jeremy Bailey über „Post-Digital Self. Die Kunst der modernen Maskerade“. War die Maske seit der Ur- und Frühgeschichte ein fassbares Objekt, verschwimmen mittels digitaler Technologien die Grenzen zwischen Maske und Gesicht. Der deutsche Medienkünstler Bartholl kuratierte gemeinsam mit Anika Meier die „Speed Show“ zum Thema Post-Digital Self, in der die Geschichte der Netzkunst erzählt wird. In einem Internetcafe klickte man sich so durch Arbeiten von NetzkünstlerInnen, wie Jeremy Bailey und Hanneke Klaver, die Identitätsbildung reflektieren und auf den Gesichtsfiltertrend reagieren.

SHOWNOTES
Einleitung 0:00 (Deutsch)
Aram Bartholl 2:43 (Deutsch)
Hanneke Klaver 13:00 (English)
Jeremy Bailey 20:00 (English)
Schluss 26:21 (Deutsch)

Der Kanadier Jeremy Bailey hat in seinem Video „The Future of Television“ (2012) den digitalen Gesichtsfiltertrend gewissermaßen vorhergesehen. Er arbeitet mit einer Gesichtserkennungssoftware. Die Zukunft des Fernsehens ist für Bailey im Jahr 2012, was heute die sozialen Medien sind: Orte der Identitätsbildung.

Die Serie #freetheexpression der niederländischen Künstlerin Hanneke Klaver ist eine Reaktion auf den Gesichtsfiltertrend. Mit Strohalmen, Metalldraht, Holz, Papier und Kleber stellt Klaver analog Filter her, die sie wie Bastelbögen verteilt. Mit ihren nicht standardisierten Gesichtsfiltern befürwortet sie die freie Meinungsäußerung.

Der deutsche Medienkünstler Aram Bartholl entwickelte im Jahr 2010 ein Ausstellungsformat, das aus einem Internet Café für einen Abend einen Ausstellungsraum macht. Im Rahmen der „Speed Show“ ist auf diesen Computern Netzkunst zu sehen. Kunst, die das Internet als Medium nutzt, sich mit den genuinen Eigenschaften des Internets auseinandersetzt und die Technik thematisiert, mit der sie arbeitet. Netzkunst existiert nicht erst, seit das Internet für ein Massenpublikum zugänglich geworden ist, aber die sozialen Medien machen es einem breiteren Publikum möglich, im Alltag bewusst oder unbewusst Netzkunst zu sehen.

LINK IN BIO. Kunst nach den sozialen Medien zeigte mit über 50 Arbeiten, wie sich Produktion und Rezeption von Kunst im Zeitalter sozialer Medien verändern. Die Gruppenausstellung endete mit der temporären Schließung des MdbK. Wir konnten uns glücklicherweise noch vorher mit einigen KünstlerInnen für diese und weitere MdbK [talk]-Folgen zusammensetzen.

Königgalerie: Interview with Anika Meier

April 19, 2020

The curators Anika Meier and Johann König host a series of talks which will be broadcasted live on Instagram. The guest are experts in net art, post-internet art and digital art, and artists who are part of the upcoming exhibition series THE ARTIST IS ONLINE

Tagged with:

Face the Face – Rundgang

February 19, 2020

Student works of the class “Face the Face” on view at Rundgang Armgartstrasse, HAW Hamburg, Jan 29th – Feb 1st 2020

WiSe 2019/20 Bachelor
Kunst mit Schwerpunkt digitale Medien
Prof. ARAM BARTHOL

Das Gesicht steht im Zentrum der menschlichen Kommunikation, emotionale Ausdrücke und Grimassen finden weltweite universell übereinstimmung. Menschen sind von Natur aus darauf trainiert Gesichter besonders gut zu erkennen und sie zu erinnern. Mit einer Masken das Gesicht zu verdecken, sich unkenntlich zu machen oder in eine andere Rolle zu schlüpfen entspricht einer uralten Tradition menschlicher Kultur. Das Portrait, früher nur den Reichen als Gemälde vorbehalten wurde durch die Photographie ein Allgemeingut.

In Zeiten digitaler Kommunikation hat sich die Rolle des Gesichts und dessen Abbild noch einmal besonders verstärkt. Heute tragen fast alle Menschen ein Kamera-Smartphone mit sich herum. Soziale Netzwerke und das allgegenwärtige Selfie transferiert das ‚Ich‘ auf eine weitere Stufe der digitalen Abstraktion. Virtuelle Masken, Facetune Überbeauty und endlose Social Feeds ermöglichen ganz neue Perspektiven bei der Formung des eigenen Körpers als digitales alter Ego. Andererseits Spielt die automatisierte Erkennung von Gesichtern durch Computer und Software eine immer stärkere Rolle. Angefangen bei der Unlock-Funktion im Telefon, oder automatischer Erkennung von Freunden im Fotoalbum bis hin zu riesigen Datenbanken der Internetunternehmen und staatlichen Organe sind Fotos von Gesichtern und deren Zuordnung zu Identitäten nicht mehr wegzudenken. Zunehmende Kontrolle und Gesichtserkennung im Öffentlichen Raum sind hierbei aktuell wichtige Themen in der öffentlichen Diskussion.

Die Studierenden des Kurses Face The Face haben sich mit all diesen Themen und Fragen detailliert auseinandergesetzt. Es sind unterschiedlichste Projekte in Form von Videos, Animationen, Facefilter aber auch Skulpturen, Performance, Texte oder Photographien entstanden.

All pictures -> https://www.flickr.com/photos/bartholl/albums/72157713172070588

#BrechtDrop

February 16, 2020

As part of a discussion panel at the Brecht Haus Berlin last thursday I made a Dead Drop in the entrance hallway. Come by visit the house and drop some files!

Die kleine Intervention: Weniger Spektakel, mehr Wirkung?

Do 13.02.19:30
Installation und Gespräch
Brecht-Tage 2020, Literaturforum im Brecht-Haus

Mit Aram Bartholl und Helgard Haug (Rimini Protokoll)
Moderation Cornelius Puschke

Anhand von Aram Bartholls „Dead Drops“ (mit Live-Installation) und Projekten von Rimini Protokoll geht es um die Frage, ob die kleine, unauffällige oder parasitäre Aktionsform wirksamer ist als die skandalösen Groß-Interventionen, die ebenso schnell wieder verschwinden wie sie erschienen sind.

Tagged with: +