Current Events

Urban Art Biennale

26. April – 10. November 2024
Biennial, Völklinger Hüttte, Saarbrücken

The World In My Hand

18. April – 31. October 2024
Group Show, Alexanser Tutsek-Stiftung, München

The World in My Hand explores the smartphone as both object and aesthetic inspiration for artistic creation. It comments on public debates surrounding the many uses of smartphones: from always-on media consumption to digital detox, from swiping and matching to ghosting and blocking, from language atrophy to information overload, from resource depletion to status symbol.

The curators, Dr Jörg Garbrecht and Katharina Wenkler, have chosen a narrative approach to the exhibition. In eight chapters, they summarize various aspects and debates surrounding the smartphone, ranging from the launch date of our daily digital companion to its characteristic touchscreen and the contractions of time and space it enables. Deeply personal moments – such as Ai Weiwei’s selfie at the moment of his arrest or Sergey Melnitchenko’s photograph of his son during a blackout in Kyiv – appear alongside themes of perception and presentation of the self, as realized in the glass sculpture Stability by Julija Pociūtė. Other subjects include: looking for love online, as in Ariane Forkel’s Casanova’s Kabinett or John Yuyi’s Tinder Match; the complexities and pitfalls of digital communication, for example in the works of James Akers or Alejandra Seeber; and the smartphone as a means of staying in touch during pandemic lockdown isolation, for instance in the work of George McLeod. Edward Burtynsky’s photograph of lithium mines in the Atacama Desert calls attention to the topic of raw materials for electronic devices.

With works by:
Tornike Abuladze, James Akers, Ai Weiwei, Kate Baker, Aram Bartholl, Tillie Burden, Edward Burtynsky, Yvon Chabrowski, Julia Chamberlain, Rachel Daeng Ngalle, Erwin Eisch, Ariane Forkel, Shige Fujishiro, Valentin Goppel, David Horvitz, Artem Humilevskyi, Gudrun Kemsa, Zsuzsanna Kóródi, Brigitte Kowanz, George McLeod, Sergey Melnitchenko, Jonas Noël Niedermann, Julian Opie, Cornelia Parker, Katie Paterson mit Zeller & Moye, Julija Pociūtė, Rebecca Ruchti, Karin Sander, Jeffrey Sarmiento, Alejandra Seeber, JanHein van Stiphout, Jolita Vaitkute, Sascha Weidner, John Yuyi, Jeff Zimmer

pictures

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Upcoming Events

25 Jahre Stiftung Springhornhof

21. September – 3. November 2024
Group Show, Springhornhof, Neuenkirchen

Flussbad Berlin

11. – 30. September 2024
Group Show, Roter Saal, Berlin

Recent Events

Killyourphone workshop

13. April 2024
Workshop, Transmediale exhibition hosted by Kunstraum Kreuzberg, Berlin

14:00 – 16:00

Killyourphone is an open workshop format. Participants are invited to make their own signal blocking phone pouch. In the pouch the phone can’t send or receive any signals. It is dead! This workshop was run for the first time at the Chaos Communication Congress in Hamburg end of 2013.

Stitch Incoming!!

25. March 2024
Curatorial, Speed Show at Web Cafe, Athens

Monday 25th of March, 7:00 PM at Web Cafe, Eptanisou 40, 113 61 , Kypseli – Athens

with:
!Mediengruppe Bitnik with Selena Savić & Gordan Savičić , Ingrid Hideki, Joanna Bacas, Kyriaki Goni, Maria Mavropoulou, Marina Gioti, Marsunev, Nadja Buttendorf, Theo Triantafyllidis

Curated by Aram Bartholl & Socrates Stamatatos

Speed Show lands in Greece, the country of souvlaki, the sun (yes we can claim that they originated a celestial body), ouzo, feta, an enormous financial debt. Currently, Greece is also trending for all the wrong reasons namely, gentrification, queerphobia, state crimes and more dystopic incidents.
As 2024 unfolds, we find ourselves amidst a whirlwind of confusion, bombarded with a cacophony of online horrors to consume, an attention span further abbreviated by TikTok’s algorithm and the barrage of incoming stitches.

Stitches Incoming serve as a conduit for creators to engage and converse, traversing from one topic to the next. They have evolved into a new social fabric, weaving connections within an ever-shifting digital and physical landscape while also serving as a testament to personal and collective traumas, both past and present.

What unites the participating digital artists? Perhaps everything and nothing simultaneously… Departing from the traditional Speed Show setup, where artworks are carefully stacked inside internet cafe computers, and drawing inspiration from the structure of TikTok stitches, each piece seems to propel the conversation forward, or perhaps uses the next as a springboard for its own narrative.

Stitch this and stitch that, we have everything you ever wanted (maybe) ! Are we stuck in an infinite loop of sh*tposting, valuable content, the highlight of social issues, personal and interpersonal experiences?
Maybe! Come and find out…

More info on Speed Shows at https://speedshow.net/stitch-incoming/

Killyourphone workshop

23. March 2024
Workshop, Transmediale exhibition hosted by Kunstraum Kreuzberg, Berlin

14:00 – 16:00

Killyourphone is an open workshop format. Participants are invited to make their own signal blocking phone pouch. In the pouch the phone can’t send or receive any signals. It is dead! This workshop was run for the first time at the Chaos Communication Congress in Hamburg end of 2013.

Killyourphone workshop

9. March 2024
Workshop, Transmediale exhibition hosted by Kunstraum Kreuzberg, Berlin

14:00 – 16:00

Killyourphone is an open workshop format. Participants are invited to make their own signal blocking phone pouch. In the pouch the phone can’t send or receive any signals. It is dead! This workshop was run for the first time at the Chaos Communication Congress in Hamburg end of 2013.

Blog Archive for Month: January 2018

Don't show again

January 30, 2018

Group show by the class New Media, Prof. Aram Bartholl, Kunsthochschule Kassel.
dont-show-again-new-media-kassel-reaktor-vienna

pic by sighpoutshrug
 

Don’t Show Again!

Constant alerts, requests, and notifications keep us immersed in information flowing daily across our screens. Little windows appear at the monitor’s edge and jump onto smartphone taskbars; milky overlays interfere with viewing entire web pages.
It is down to attention. User attention is now the most valuable commodity on the Internet. The online advertising industry is in real crisis. Only the biggest advertising monopolies–Google and Facebook–can still benefit from advertising revenue, while all others are left with nothing. Social media networks are saturated, user numbers are stagnating; there is an increasing fatigue with liking, sharing and posting because too many services, news items, and friend requests are competing for our attention. It seems as if faith in what is presented to us on screens is diminishing. “That’s fake” is the new standard. A limited number of meme-like headlines get global attention while important issues sink without a trace. We spend on average up to three hours a day on smartphones only to ask ourselves later what we actually achieved.
New Media students of Kunsthochschule Kassel deal with questions of attention, identity, and the use of media in a variety of ways. How do images and topics appear and spread through the Internet? What role does the screen play as a limit to understanding, and how will automation continue to change society? Overcoming the post-digital regime of attention will require new ideas and concepts that the technology-centered efficiency logic of internet platforms can never provide.
 
Participating Students:
Nicole Brauer, İpek Burçak, Echo Can Luo, Christopher Casper, Hannes Drescher, Stefan Endres, Robin Höke, Mike Huntemann, Saskia Kaffenberger, Jonas Leichsenring, Naima Omari, Didem Sandıkcı, Mario Strahl,
Video program: Lucie Friederike Müller, Jacob Höfle, Lisa Dreykluft, …

http://dontshowagain.online website by Stefan Endres

 
Reaktor, Wien
Vernissage: 19. Februar 2018, 19:00 Uhr
Öffnungszeiten: 20. Februar 2018, 10:00 – 16:00 Uhr
Geblergasse 40, 1170 Wien
https://www.reaktor.art/
 
(german version)
Don’t Show Again!

Ständig wiederkehrende Warnungen, Nachfragen oder Benachrichtigungen beschäftigen uns kontinuierlich bei der täglichen Informationsaufnahme am Bildschirm. Kleine Fenster erscheinen am Monitorrand, springen in der Smartphone-Taskleiste auf und milchige Overlays versperren die Sicht auf ganze Webseiten.

Es geht um Aufmerksamkeit. Die Aufmerksamkeit des Users ist heutzutage das höchste Gut im Internet. Die Online-Werbebranche befindet sich dabei in einer handfesten Krise. Nur die großen Werbemonopole Google und Facebook können noch von Werbeeinnahmen profitieren, alle anderen gehen leer aus. Viele Social Media Networks sind gesättigt, Nutzerzahlen stagnieren, eine allgemeine Müdigkeit zu liken, zu teilen und zu posten macht sich breit. Denn zu viele Dienste, Nachrichten und Freundschaftsanfragen konkurrieren miteinander. Es scheint, als wenn der Glaube an das, was uns auf dem Screen präsentiert wird, schwindet. „Das ist doch fake“ ist der neue Standard. Einzelne wenige Headlines mit Memecharakter erreichen weltweite Beachtung, während wichtige Themen untergehen. Wir verbringen tagtäglich im Schnitt bis zu drei Stunden am Handydisplay und fragen uns am Ende, was wir dort eigentlich getan haben.

Die Studierenden der Klasse Neue Medien der Kunsthochschule Kassel beschäftigen sich in vielfältiger Weise mit all diesen Fragen um Aufmerksamkeit, Identität und Mediennutzung. In welcher Art und Weise entstehen und verbreiten sich Bilder und Themen im Netz? Welche Rolle spielt der Screen verstanden als Grenze und wie wird Automatisierung unsere Gesellschaft weiter verändern? Das post-digitale Regime der Aufmerksamkeit zu brechen, erfordert neue Ideen und Konzepte. Die technikzentrierte Effizienzlogik der Internetplattformen wird diese nicht liefern.
 

'Your parcel has been delivered (to your neighbour)'

January 12, 2018

parcel-delivered-to-your-neighbour-aram-bartholl-grounded-checkout
 
20.1.2018, 7:00 pm – Installation/performance – ‘Your parcel has been delivered (to your neighbour)’
For his ongoing installation Aram Bartholl collects different objects and materials of the contemporary commerce and public space to rearrange them at the exhibition space. The elements refer to radical shifts in markets, rising control and a life under the influence of constantly improved algorithms, startup pressure and ‘bullshit jobs’. Over the period of the exhibition the installation is rearranged and changes in dialogue with the audience.
25.1.2018, 7:00 pm – Workshop – ‘Got a few minutes?’
Got a few minutes? is an open workshop format which invites the audience to experiment in a series of actions and micro performances. With different tasks involving a range of contemporary devices and objects the participants execute and invent unique interactions. Consume, control and privacy are some of the core topics which serve as a basis for this examination of the hyper commercial contemporary life.
 
IMPORT PROJECTS
KEITHSTRASSE 10
10787 BERLIN
http://import-projects.org/
 
Your parcel has been delivered (to your neighbour)
‘Your parcel has been delivered (to your neighbour)’ is a performance and ongoing installation that involves rental bikes being retrieved from public space and placed in the private gallery space. Rental bikes in public usually fall over at some point, or get kicked over by pranksters. Nobody cares. All rental bikes collected are laid out—their quasi-natural status—on the floor of the gallery. A PTZ (pan tilt and zoom) CCTV dome camera, typical for surveillance in public, auto-tracks and records the process. Visitors are invited to become a temporary owner of one of the bikes by renting it.
In recent years, Internet startup market logic has reached far beyond classic online markets. More and more ‘IRL’ economies are being affected by the ‘disruptive’ force of the new business model from California. With the efficiency of networked software, low-wage outsourced labor, and data delivering customers the only goal is growth. The startup doesn’t need to be profitable. In fact, one of the golden rules is not to make a profit, not to pay tax, and to be much cheaper and smarter than everyone else until competitors go bankrupt.
In the beginning, this ‘game’ was played solely within data-based information business. Google and Facebook led the way and showed us how to make money from user data while giving away products for free. Today, we are witness to slow changes in the cityscape. Streets have been crowded with delivery vans for years. Delivery businesses boomed in the wake of ever-increasing online shopping. Order anything! They’ll deliver it to your neighbour immediately. Instant rental cars, gamified Pokemon crowds, and bicycle food delivery armies followed. Very recently, Berlin’s public space has become crowded with at least 20 different brands of rental bikes. New startups, local and international. All of them have the same old idea: “Rent a bicycle where ever you are!” All of them burn a lot of VC (venture capital) money and bikes increase to possibly become the monopoly in this field.
Public space is increasingly inhabited by advertising and corporate models. The colorful bikes scattered all over the city are a very visible sign of the uberfication of private life and commercialization of public space.
Aram Bartholl, 2018
 
your-parcel-has-been-delivered-aram-bartholl-12
your-parcel-has-been-delivered-aram-bartholl-15
your-parcel-has-been-delivered-aram-bartholl-18
your-parcel-has-been-delivered-aram-bartholl-06
your-parcel-has-been-delivered-aram-bartholl-04
your-parcel-has-been-delivered-aram-bartholl-10

 
 

Your parcel has been delivered (to your neighbour)

January 12, 2018

20.1.2018, 7:00 pm – Installation/performance – ‘Your parcel has been delivered (to your neighbour)’

For his ongoing installation Aram Bartholl collects different objects and materials of the contemporary commerce and public space to rearrange them at the exhibition space. The elements refer to radical shifts in markets, rising control and a life under the influence of constantly improved algorithms, startup pressure and ‘bullshit jobs’. Over the period of the exhibition the installation is rearranged and changes in dialogue with the audience.

25.1.2018, 7:00 pm – Workshop – ‘Got a few minutes?’

Got a few minutes? is an open workshop format which invites the audience to experiment in a series of actions and micro performances. With different tasks involving a range of contemporary devices and objects the participants execute and invent unique interactions. Consume, control and privacy are some of the core topics which serve as a basis for this examination of the hyper commercial contemporary life.

IMPORT PROJECTS
KEITHSTRASSE 10
10787 BERLIN
http://import-projects.org/

Stream Capture

January 8, 2018
Ludy_Pond_Wave_2017_WEB_1
Stream Capture explores the role and position of the landscape and natural environment within a world shaped by technology and digital media.

Through the use and lens of digital tools and technology, Stream Capture asks how we might engage with a reimagining of the natural environment if we cannot physically enter it. The work in the exhibition explores human perception, simulation, mapping, time and scale shifts, and historical study and preservation. The exhibition offers a sense of the future and the possibility of movement from place to place (here to there) and from time to time (present to future).
MCAD Gallery
Minneapolis College of Art and Design
Tuesday, January 16, 2018, 9:00 a.m.Sunday, March 4, 2018, 5:00 p.m.
Opening Reception: Friday, January 19, 6:00–8:00 p.m.
The artists featured in the exhibition work in a range of media, including prints, installation, projection, video, software, video games, sculpture, plants, and electronics.
Featured Artists

Stream Capture is curated by Ben Moren, assistant professor of media arts at MCAD.
Image credit: Sara Ludy, Pond Wave, 2017, 4K animation

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