Current Events

Art Me!

21. April – 30. July 2022
Group Show, Galerie Charlot, Paris

At the heart of the Art Me! exhibition is the desire to reconsider what unites artists to their artworks, which they inhabit, populate with characters, or open to the public. The idea, therefore, as Allan Kaprow suggested in the Sixties, is that nothing must separate art from life, as attested by his Essays on the Blurring of Art and Life (1993). Nowadays, there are still artists performing happenings whether privately, in the public space, or on the Internet, benefiting from the magic and efficiency of contemporary technologies in order to embody their creations. We must recognise that there are many techniques that encourage artists to rethink the nature of their relationship to the beings that literally ‘populate’ their works, for example: scanning, modelling, or motion capture, and also artificial intelligence. The 3D models thus represented are in the exact measure of real people. It could be a matter of detail, one might think, but in fact this distinction is likely to reinforce the empathy of the audience inevitably recognising itself in a gesture or a posture that is strangely familiar. But revolutions, in art, are also the consequences of the democratisations of the artistic practices due to the emergence of innovations: going from the Kodak film to the Apple iPhone, not to mention the platforms of sharing, precisely where artistic practices mix with those of hobbyists without knowing who influences who! Indeed, how many artists collect their image files by tracking them through their index names in the realm of emojis to create collages that continue well beyond the frames? Finally, there are the artworks of which we are the heroes: the creations that we experience, through manipulation or virtually. By interacting, we magnify technical objects; in immersion, without any body, we become the essential component of the artwork that we complete, in the case that we are not already the artwork itself. Like the artists creating happenings and more widely performers who, in action, not only make an act of creation, but also are the creation itself. This brings us back to the French translation of Allan Kaprow’s book that is even more precise: L’art et la vie confondus. – Dominique Moulon 2022

With: Aram Bartholl – Chun Hua Catherine Dong – Misha Margolis – Matt Pike – Sabrina Ratté – Marie Serruya – Pierrick Sorin – Jeanne Susplugas – Penelope Umbrico – Eric Vernhes – Du Zhenjun

Curation : Dominique Moulon / V.Hasson-Benillouche

House of Mirrors: Artificial Intelligence as Phantasm

9. April – 31. July 2022
Group Show, HMKV, Dortmund

The exhibition House of Mirrors: Artificial Intelligence as Phantasm will address AI-related issues like hidden human labor, algorithmic bias/discrimination, the problem of categorization and classification, and our imaginations and phantasms about AI, and it will also ask the question about whether (and how) it is possible to regain agency in this context. More than 20 artworks by international artists will be presented in an exhibition which will be subdivided into seven thematic chapters and whose scenography will be reminiscent of a giant house of mirrors. In May 2022, a 200-page bi-lingual catalogue will be published (German/English) as printed matter and as a free online PDF.

Participating artists:
Aram Bartholl, Pierre Cassou-Noguès, Stéphane Degoutin, Sean Dockray, Jake Elwes, Anna Engelhardt, Nicolas Gourault, Adam Harvey, Libby Heaney, Lauren Huret, Zheng Mahler, Lauren Lee McCarthy, Simone C Niquille, Elisa Giardina Papa, Julien Prévieux, Anna Ridler, RYBN, Sebastian Schmieg, Gwenola Wagon, Conrad Weise, Mushon Zer-Aviv

Curatored by:
Inke Arns, Francis Hunger, Marie Lechner

pictures

The Glass Room

18. January – 26. November 2022
Group Show, MOD, Adelaide

The Glass Room MOD
The Glass Room is a public intervention that aims to educate about technology. With a sleek tech shop vibe, visitors can freely and critically discuss their relationships with data privacy.

Having toured Europe and the US, it will be visiting Australia for the first time in 2022.

From the tech boom to tech backlash, our understanding of the digital has become both deeply personal and deeply political. Our desire for convenience has given way to questions about the trade-offs for how much we can control our data and our understanding about how it is used.

The Glass Room is a place to explore these ideas. The objects here bring to life the hidden aspects of everyday technologies and examine how they are changing the way we live. The objects in The Glass Room provide unconventional and unexpected ways of seeing your relationship with your data.

As technology becomes embedded in every part of our lives, The Glass Room helps you look deeper into the digital: Does your personal data say everything about you, or is it an imperfect portrait? Do more tools, apps, and information make us better and more efficient, or are we giving away more than we want in return? What goes on behind the screens and inside the black boxes of the devices we interact with everyday? If we knew, would we still sign in or click ‘I agree’? How much trust do users invest in big tech companies, and what can be done if that trust is broken? If you want to learn more, you can visit our Data Detox Bar to pick up our Data Detox Kit, which offers you simple tips to enhance your digital privacy, security, and wellbeing.

Featured Artists:

Dries Depoorter, Aram Bartholl, Kiki Mager, Bengt Sjölén, Danja Vasiliev, Sebastian Schmieg, !Mediengruppe Bitnik, Tega Brain / Sam Lavigne, Kyriaki Goni, La Loma, and Tactical Tech

?>

Upcoming Events

DFG-Schwerpunktprogramms „Das digitale Bild”

7. – 9. July 2022
Talk, Online, Munich, Marburg

Recent Events

Metapolitisches Hüpfen

10. June 2022
Performance, Grosse Bergstrasse / Goetheplatz, Hamburg

Symposium und antifaschistische Hüpfburg
Große Bergstraße/ Goetheplatz, Hamburg
13:00-19:00 Uhr

Mohamed Amjahid (Vortrag & Diskussion)
Wie aus der Parallelgesellschaft herausspringen?
Über homogen weisse Räume in der Stadt

Aram Bartholl (Performance & Gespräch)
Greetings from Hamburg!
Wie umgehen mit geschichtsrevisionistischer Architektur?

Eduard Freudmann (Vortrag)
Kontextualisierung, Umgestaltung, Weggestaltung
Künstlerische und aktivistische Auseinandersetzungen mit geschichtspolitischen Manifestationen im öffentlichen Raum

Cornelia Siebeck (Thesen & gemeinsames Nachdenken)
Was wir „vergessen“ haben, oder:
Für eine Erinnerungsarbeit ohne Selbstvergewisserung

Nora Sternfeld (Vortrag)
Errungene Erinnerungen
Kontaktzonen umkämpfter und geteilter Geschichte

Gegenwärtig sind wir mit einer rechten Metapolitik konfrontiert, die mit kulturellen Setzungen versucht zivilgesellschaftliche Überzeugungen und kulturelle Diskurse jenseits von Parlamenten nach eigenen Vorstellungen zu verändern. Während das Konzept der Metapolitik eigentlich für den Aufbau einer demokratischen Zivilgesellschaft gedacht war, zielt die Neue Rechte darauf ab, gesellschaftliche Komplexität auf essentialistische Vorstellungen von Kultur, Nation und Volk zu reduzieren. Mit Rekonstruktionen historischer Architektur, ideologischer Inanspruchnahme von Orten, aber auch Angriffen auf Parlamente versucht sie abgeschlossene Identitäten zu konstruieren. Im Ringen um die kulturelle Hegemonie entwendet die Neue Rechte auch den Künsten ihre Strategien, mit denen zuvor noch für eine offene und vielfältige Gesellschaft eingetreten wurde. Sie richtet die performativen Methoden nun gegen die vielfältige Kultur selbst. Dafür dreht sie das kritische Potential der Künste in eine affirmative Symbolhaftigkeit um und verwendet das progressive Moment der Künste für ihre regressiven Ideen.

Obwohl die permanente Gefahr besteht, die entwickelten künstlerischen Praxen in den Händen von Personen mit autoritären und völkischen Vorstellungen wiederzufinden, besteht nach wie vor die Notwendigkeit mit Kunst Ideen davon zu entwickeln, wie wir als Gesellschaft gerne zusammenleben wollen. Metapolitisches Hüpfen bietet den Anlass, rechte Metapolitik zu diskutieren und schafft zugleich den Raum, um Gegenstrategien zu entwickeln. Um die Frage nach dem Umgang mit symbolischen Räumen so zuzuspitzen, dass sie sichtbar und diskutierbar wird, wird das Hambacher Schloss als Symbol für Demokratie aber auch nationalistische Vereinnahmung in eine antifaschistische Hüpfburg transformiert. Die Architektur wird zur Infrastruktur für ein eintägiges Symposium im öffentlichen Raum, das Widersprüchlichkeit zulässt und auf dem nicht nur theoretisch, sondern auch praktisch und performativ Strategien gegen rechte Metapolitik entwickelt, erprobt und debattiert werden.

Mit: Mohamed Amjahid, Aram Bartholl, Eduard Freudmann, Cornelia Siebeck und Nora Sternfeld
Konzeption: Frieder Bohaumilitzky
Grafikdesign Flyer & Plakat: Torben Körschkes

www.metapolitisches-huepfen.de

DeadDrops in H4v4n4

23. – 31. May 2022
Group Show, El Paquete Semanal, Havana

DeadDrops in H4v4n4 and !!!Sección ARTE [No. 37], Paquete Semanal, collaboration with Nestor Siré [May, 2022] Cuba.

Video des Monats

1. – 31. May 2022
Solo Show, HMKV, Dortmund

In the series HMKV Video of the Month, HMKV presents in monthly rotation current video works by international artists – selected by Inke Arns”

“TOP25”, 2018, video, 5:44 min

TOP25 is a series of short 3D animation sequences featuring the 25 most used passwords in the world. Standard, easy-to-guess passwords like ‘123456’ or ‘admin’—frequently the default preset passwords for routers and other devices in the past—still pose a significant security threat to computer systems in general. This collection of well-known passwords is presented in a style of 3D animation often used for YouTube intros. It is very common practice among YouTubers to use short and very to-the-point 3D animations of their logo and name to introduce their channels, and a whole scene of young YouTubers exchange and share the 3D source files (Blender 3D) online to help new channel producers generate their own intros. Though the animations are remixed and altered, the general aesthetics follow a very clear visual concept. All sequences in this video are original designs and arrangements by different creators; the text has been altered to match the top 25 passwords.

 

Call Me

9. April – 10. June 2022
Group Show, galeriepcp, Paris

In 1979 D. Scott Rogo and Raymond Bayless published their book Phone Calls From the Dead. It brought together reports of paranormal experiences describing phone calls from recently deceased people. The authors connected these narratives to electromagnetic effects and electronic voice phenomenon. These experiences highlight how the phone has become a metaphor for our desire for meaning and communication. The word telephone itself plays on this concept. It comes from the Greek far or distant (τῆλε, tēle), and voice (φωνή, phōnē).

Telephones today are not just audio devices that transform sound into electronic signals. Phones are surfaces onto which we project emotional desire. They are contemporary fetish objects, surveillance devices and encyclopaedias. They isolate and connect. The artworks in this exhibition question this relationship between us and the ‘thing’ in its dumb and symbolic reality.

Curated by Francesca Gavin

with:
Anthony D Green, Aram Bartholl, Britta Thie, Cecilie Norgaard, Christian Ingemann, Cory Arcangel, Damien Roach, Jermaine Francis, Juliette Blightman, Stephen Dunne

Blog Archive for Tag: deaddrop

DULL-E Dead Drops

June 8, 2022

The artist Fabiola Larios described the Dead Drops to the AI picture generating system DALL-E.
It resulted in these generated pictures! 👏👏… love it! Thx! :))

Tagged with: + +

Dead Drops appear on Elementary

November 3, 2016

@arambartholl dead drop on Elementary 🙂 pic.twitter.com/BslUrpBKrv

— Theodore Watson (@theowatson) https://twitter.com/theowatson/status/793612879928885248 November 2, 2016

Thanks to Jonah Brucker-Cohen & Theo Watson for pointing out the appearance of a Dead Drop in the TV show ‘Elementary‘. Cool! 🙂

Tagged with: +

Dead Drops at Palais de Tokyo

June 30, 2015

dead-drops-palais-de-tokyo-paris-02
dead-drops-palais-de-tokyo-paris-05
dead-drops-palais-de-tokyo-paris-28

Born in Germany in 1972, Bartholl focuses on interrelations between the digital world and our physical surroundings. He obtained his degree in architecture from the University of arts in Berlin, where he lives and works. His artistic work has been shown in numerous festivals and exhibitions in museums and galleries. In 2011, five Dead Drops were part of the “Talk to me” exhibition at the MoMA in New York and a new facet of the project saw the day in 2013 with the installation of a DVD Dead Drop at Museum of the Moving Image in New York as well. Palais de Tokyo is the first French institution to welcome Dead Drops.
Cited from “Somewhere between Cyber and Real: An interview with Aram Bartholl”, by Jillian Steinhauer, 2012, http://hyperallergic.com

dead-drops-palais-de-tokyo-paris-22
dead-drops-palais-de-tokyo-paris-10
dead-drops-palais-de-tokyo-paris-16
dead-drops-palais-de-tokyo-paris-19
dead-drops-palais-de-tokyo-paris-26
deaddrops-palais-thunmbn1
more pictures on flickr
Links for all four Dead Drops: