Current Events

Me And My Machine

18. September – 13. December 2021
Group Show, Lehmbruck Museum, Duisburg

Glass Room – An exhibition by Tactical Tech

16. August – 24. October 2021
Group Show, dbieb, Leeuwarden

Supermarket of Images

28. May – 10. October 2021
Group Show, Red Brick Art Museum, China

Red Brick Art Museum will present Le supermarché des images on May 28 thanks to the efforts of Chief Curator Peter Szendy, professor of Comparative Literature and Humanities at Brown University, and assistants Emmanuel Alloa and Marta Ponsa. 39 artists and groups will participate and offer over 50 works using a variety of media, such as photography, painting, sculpture, videos, and installations. Artists include Maurizio Cattelan, Yves Klein, Andreas Gursky, Robert Bresson, William Kentridge, Sophie Calle, and Kevin Abosch, the last being an NFT artist who has recently found himself standing in the limelight.

The theme is inspired by the concept of “iconomy” that developed in Peter Szendy’s 2017 book Visible Supermarkets: The Universal Economy of Images. Living during an era marked by image overproduction, he sought to explore a new way of understanding these icons. It was more appropriate than ever to ask questions about the economic importance of images and their storage, velocity of circulation, component materials, and fluctuations in value. how to represent economic processes that often escape our mind, and how to think about the image from an economic standpoint. In short, how images have become a new form of capital.

In concert with the “supermarket” metaphor, the exhibition discusses five image-based perspectives: “Stocks, Raw Materials, Work, Values and Exchanges”. The event aims to take a keen look at the profit and loss of the image economy and shall present current hot topics including the abuses of images, internet giants and their fingers in every pie, the protection of personal information, “micro jobs” and digital labor, and cryptocurrencies. Those are the “bricks” that we use to construct the world we live in today and our modern lifestyle which undergoes reshaping and changing.

As part of the 15th Le Festival Croisements, Le supermarché des images (The Supermarket of Images) is organized by the Jeu de Paume and the Ambassade de France en Chine, with the support of the Institut français de Pékin.

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Upcoming Events

Decision Making – L’instant décisif

9. December 2021 – 13. March 2022
Group Show, Canadien Cultural Centre, Paris

Decisions are the result of complex cognitive processes. Considering them collectively when they involve our shared futures makes them harder to make. But, more and more often, we include machines into such processes through algorithms qualified as decisional. Of course, it raises questions that artists know how to put into perspective. Because of the age that we are currently living in, a brief instant regarding the whole history of our planet, is decisive considering the choices available to us for a responsible development of Artificial Intelligence. Therefore, it is now that human rights are at stake, for instance, about what will emerge from the use of our personal data. The consideration of artworks coming from decisive processes connecting humans to machines could only spring us into an immediate future that still belongs to us.

Curated by Dominique Moulon & Alain Thibault

Domestic Drama

2. December 2021 – 20. February 2022
Group Show, Halle Für Kunst, Graz

Museum of Cryptography

10. November 2021 – 23. June 2022
Group Show, Museum of Cryptography, Moscow

2021 году в Москве откроется первый в России Музей криптографии.

Широкой аудитории будет представлено прошлое, настоящее и будущее криптографии, математики и смежных дисциплин. Музей криптографии станет новой точкой притяжения на карте города — местом, где доступно и просто говорят о развитии современных технологий.

Здание, в котором будет расположен Музей криптографии, впервые откроет свои двери для широкой публики. В советские годы это была знаменитая «шарашка» в Марфино, где ученые разрабатывали аппаратуру для шифрования телефонной связи.

Важной частью музея станут мультимедийные экспонаты, инфографика и интерактивные островки формата look&feel, а также редкие экземпляры научных трудов.

Внимание! Молодежная команда Музея криптографии сформирована. Подробности

Glass Room – An exhibition by Tactical Tech

5. November 2021 – 16. January 2022
Group Show, OBA, Amsterdam

The Principle of Hope

16. October 2021 – 27. February 2022
Group Show, Inside-Out Art Museum, Beijing

Exhibition Title: The Principle of Hope

Artistic Directors: Carol Yinghua Lu, Luo Xiaoming

Curatorial Team: Huang Wenlong, Li Xiangning, Liang Chouwa, Yin Shuai, Jerome, Zhou Boya, Zhu Siyu

Exhibition Dates: 30 Sep 2021 (TBC) to 27 Feb 2022

Venue: Inside-Out Art Museum, 50 Xingshikou Road, Haidian District, Beijing, China

Recent Events

Hypernormalisation

30. July – 13. August 2021
Solo Show, Kunstsommer Arnsberg, Arnsberg

Visitors of the Bürgeramt Arnsberg are invited to have their portrait taken which in the following is run through a face recognition software. Choose an emoji, font and color to have your face ‘de-recognized’. The resulting picture is directly printed on A3+ Hahnemühle art photo paper for you to take home!

“Hypernormalisation”
Opening, Friday 30.7. 11:00-13:00
2.8.-13.8. 10:00-16:00
Historisches Rathaus Arnsberg
Organized by @kulturarnsberg thx!

Supported by:
@kultursekretariatguetersloh
#ministeriumkulturwissenschaftnrw
@stadtverwaltung_arnsberg

Credits:
thx @nadjalien for test portrait!
thx @tlsaeger for code!
thx @schw__rz for invitation design!

 

 

pictures

Artist Talk

10. June 2021
Talk, +CODE, Buenos Aires

Thinking landscapes: Beyond a framework

9. – 12. June 2021
Group Show, +CODE, Buenos Aires

How to Win at Photography

5. June 2021 – 5. September 2021
Group Show, Fotomuseum Winterthur, Winterthur

How to Win at Photography – Image-Making as Play explores the relationship between photography and play. It investigates the notion of image play, creating unexpected connections between the history of photography, the gamification of the visible as well as practices of image making with and within computer games.

The group exhibition How to Win at Photography includes more than forty positions from contemporary and 20th century photography. Through an assemblage of multimedia artworks and vernacular images, the exhibition questions the very meaning and function of photography today.

Are we playing with the camera or is the camera ultimately playing us? Are we really in charge or are we mere pawns in larger technical, social, cultural and economic networks? What can a playful photographer achieve on a political and socio-cultural level? Who and what is performing the act of seeing and capturing – humans, machines or a combination of both? Who is playing along? And finally, can this game be won? These are just some of the questions posed by How to Win at Photography.
The exhibition invites visitors to focus on the playful aspects of photography. The exhibition looks at artists and photographers who play with – and sometimes against – the camera, document the environments of videogames and question the notion of identity, gender and class.

With works by: Cory Arcangel, Aram Bartholl, Dorothée Elisa Baumann, Justin Berry, Julius Brauckmann, Alan Butler, Claude Cahun, Cibelle Cavalli Bastos, Dries Depoorter & Max Pinckers, Philipp Dorl, Constant Dullaart, Harun Farocki, Christopher Graves, Aneta Grzeszykowska, Beate Gütschow, Jon Haddock, Emily Hadrich, Florence Henri, Roc Herms, John Hilliard, Yuyi John, Rindon Johnson, Andy Kassier, Sherrie Levine, Gloria López Cleries & Sive Hamilton Helle, René Mächler, Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs, Joan Pamboukes, Steven Pippin, Michael Reisch, Tabor Robak, Ria Patricia Röder, Lorna Ruth Galloway, Ed Ruscha, Emma Agnes Sheffer, Cindy Sherman, Guido Segni, Andrew Stine, Petra Szemán, Akihiko Taniguchi, Danielle Udogaranya, Coralie Vogelaar, Tamás Waliczky and Ai Weiwei.

In collaboration with the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts and the Centre for the Study of the Networked Image at London South Bank University.

Blog Archive for Tag: podcast

Crossing Property Lines

July 18, 2020

Prof. Agnes Förster and Martin Bangratz from Urban planing RWTH Aachen invited me to their podcast series “Whats Next“. Below their article accompanying the conversation in German. Thx!!

 https://www.planung-neu-denken.de/podcasts/crossing-property-lines/

Crossing Property Lines

The relatively soft lockdown in Germany has forced innovation on many firms and schools, revealing the country’s shortcomings in the area of digital transformation, such as broadband access. While some of Aram Bartholl’s friends in the arts and programming scene notice hardly any difference in their routines, other, less digitalized professions have been hit hard. For Mr. Bartholl himself, teaching online has turned out to be a challenge. But what struck him most was the temporary absence of urban public space as a platform for expression. It feels liberating to see large demonstrations back in the city, both for noble and questionable causes.

Aram Bartholl’s work has dealt with digital space since his thesis in architectural studies in 2001. Back then he started with simple interventions – taking boxes from computer games and placing them in the city. He was looking at games such as first-person shooters, where the knowledge of a virtual space is crucial to the gameplay. And he found himself wondering: what does it mean to place objects from a digital realm into physical space? Do the spaces merge, or do they still belong to separate worlds?

This dualism of what is analogue and what is digital is so intertwined these days, that we are unable to distinguish one from the other. […] Of course, everything that happens there is real, it has an effect on our lives. Aram Bartholl 06/2020

A number of techno-social upheavals of our lifetime have influenced Bartholl’s work, as he observes the permeation of digital technology. The first disillusionment around 2000, when the dotcom bubble burst, the introduction of smartphones in 2007, the rise of global Internet corporations. Aram Bartholl has followed these trends closely and is still astonished by the dynamics of these tools which are so inscribed in our society; a tweet by the American president may cause immediate reactions in the stock market or foreign relations. The effects of technological developments are also becoming increasingly manifest in our cities. An early example were delivery services that visibly affect urban logistics and business closures. More recently, electric scooters and bicycles have turned up in cities worldwide – demanding our attention with a colorful design reminiscent of animated icons back in a web 2.0 era. They are objects that seem to bring the promise of a trendy internet startup into urban space, Silicon Valley Solutionism arriving in cities around the globe. Unsurprisingly, their promise of a shift towards sustainable mobility has yet to occur, as that would require political guidance and many other factors to align.

Urban space has always been a native ground for Bartholl’s work. To him, it is more exciting than the white cube with its preconceived notions and expectations about art. Outside, the audience is random and may start a discourse that would never happen in a controlled artistic environment. To encourage people to think critically about the relationship of private property and public space, Aram Bartholl recently took rental bikes from the street to exhibit them as sculptures in a gallery. Visitors were still free to rent the bikes and take them back outside, but the project challenged people’s notions of ownership, of public and private space. In a follow-up project, Bartholl is fishing algae-covered electric scooters out of Berlin’s channels to display at Kunstraum Kreuzberg, showing once again that their promise of sustainability doesn’t hold water.

We are currently experiencing social media and the internet profoundly as a public space for discussion – in contrast to urban space – even though these platforms are run by private firms, with all the problems this entails. Aram Bartholl 06/2020

Just as private objects start to clog up public space, the digital space we perceive as public space is in fact in the hands of private corporations. Inoffensive mottos and ludic logotypes suggest harmlessness, but these firms are ultimately listed and profit-oriented. This seems problematic considering the history of privatization of other public infrastructures. Europe is hard-pressed to develop independent digital infrastructures.

In 2010, Aram Bartholl began a project that has since turned into a global movement: Dead Drops are flash drives embedded in a wall so that only the USB connector sticks out. Not connected to the internet, they constitute a statement against censorship and about the relationship between our new, digital reality, and the brick and mortar of cities. New Dead Drops still pop up, over 2.500 are currently listed globally [link: deaddrops.com]. Sharing things digitally through concepts such as open source and creative commons has led to unprecedented levels of collective production and consumption of content. Movements such as Fridays For Future or Black Lives Matter would not have been possible without the viral effects of social networks. In another recent example, the German hacker and programming community has pushed the government to adopt an open-source approach to their COVID19 tracking app.

Data should be free, Bartholl agrees, yet he urges us to consider what could happen with our data in the future. If research institutions are using photos found online to train artificial intelligence models that may ultimately be used for military purposes, it raises questions about the merit of uploading billions of images each day. And movements such as the alt-right have been quick to adopt internet and meme culture and learned to improve their own false-flag tactics.

Aram Bartholl continues his investigation of technology and space. Given the current discussion around the removal of outmoded monuments, he tinkers with augmented reality to attach digital artefacts to sculptures. And, referencing the hashtag #natureishealing, he announces that he will be fishing for more discarded bicycles in the river Spree.

Aram Bartholl is a Berlin based concept artist who investigates the relationship between digital and physical space. Since 2019, Bartholl teaches art with a focus on digital media as a professor at Hamburg University of Applied Sciences.

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Radio Spätkauf: Interview

June 29, 2020

This mini episode features Daniel Stern interviewing artist Aram Barthall about his recent installation “Unlock Life” which utilizes remnants of the recent bike share boom.

Find out more about at Aram Bartholl at https://arambartholl.com and see the exhibit until the 16th of August at https://www.kunstraumkreuzberg.de.

http://www.radiospaetkauf.com/2020/06/rs-mini-unlock-life/

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Post-Digital Self. Die Kunst der modernen Maskerade

April 27, 2020


MdbK Podcast #019: LINK IN BIO, 27.4.2020

Wie werden heute im digitalen Alltag die Frage & Veränderung des Gesichtes, Gesichtserkennung und Facefilter diskutiert?
In der letzten MdbK [talk]-Folge zur Ausstellung LINK IN BIO, sprechen wir mit Aram Bartholl, Hanneke Klaver und Jeremy Bailey über „Post-Digital Self. Die Kunst der modernen Maskerade“. War die Maske seit der Ur- und Frühgeschichte ein fassbares Objekt, verschwimmen mittels digitaler Technologien die Grenzen zwischen Maske und Gesicht. Der deutsche Medienkünstler Bartholl kuratierte gemeinsam mit Anika Meier die „Speed Show“ zum Thema Post-Digital Self, in der die Geschichte der Netzkunst erzählt wird. In einem Internetcafe klickte man sich so durch Arbeiten von NetzkünstlerInnen, wie Jeremy Bailey und Hanneke Klaver, die Identitätsbildung reflektieren und auf den Gesichtsfiltertrend reagieren.

SHOWNOTES
Einleitung 0:00 (Deutsch)
Aram Bartholl 2:43 (Deutsch)
Hanneke Klaver 13:00 (English)
Jeremy Bailey 20:00 (English)
Schluss 26:21 (Deutsch)

Der Kanadier Jeremy Bailey hat in seinem Video „The Future of Television“ (2012) den digitalen Gesichtsfiltertrend gewissermaßen vorhergesehen. Er arbeitet mit einer Gesichtserkennungssoftware. Die Zukunft des Fernsehens ist für Bailey im Jahr 2012, was heute die sozialen Medien sind: Orte der Identitätsbildung.

Die Serie #freetheexpression der niederländischen Künstlerin Hanneke Klaver ist eine Reaktion auf den Gesichtsfiltertrend. Mit Strohalmen, Metalldraht, Holz, Papier und Kleber stellt Klaver analog Filter her, die sie wie Bastelbögen verteilt. Mit ihren nicht standardisierten Gesichtsfiltern befürwortet sie die freie Meinungsäußerung.

Der deutsche Medienkünstler Aram Bartholl entwickelte im Jahr 2010 ein Ausstellungsformat, das aus einem Internet Café für einen Abend einen Ausstellungsraum macht. Im Rahmen der „Speed Show“ ist auf diesen Computern Netzkunst zu sehen. Kunst, die das Internet als Medium nutzt, sich mit den genuinen Eigenschaften des Internets auseinandersetzt und die Technik thematisiert, mit der sie arbeitet. Netzkunst existiert nicht erst, seit das Internet für ein Massenpublikum zugänglich geworden ist, aber die sozialen Medien machen es einem breiteren Publikum möglich, im Alltag bewusst oder unbewusst Netzkunst zu sehen.

LINK IN BIO. Kunst nach den sozialen Medien zeigte mit über 50 Arbeiten, wie sich Produktion und Rezeption von Kunst im Zeitalter sozialer Medien verändern. Die Gruppenausstellung endete mit der temporären Schließung des MdbK. Wir konnten uns glücklicherweise noch vorher mit einigen KünstlerInnen für diese und weitere MdbK [talk]-Folgen zusammensetzen.