Current Events

DeadDrops in H4v4n4

23. – 31. May 2022
Group Show, El Paquete Semanal, Havana

DeadDrops in H4v4n4 and !!!Sección ARTE [No. 37], Paquete Semanal, collaboration with Nestor Siré [May, 2022] Cuba.

Video des Monats

1. – 31. May 2022
Solo Show, HMKV, Dortmund

In the series HMKV Video of the Month, HMKV presents in monthly rotation current video works by international artists – selected by Inke Arns”

“TOP25”, 2018, video, 5:44 min

TOP25 is a series of short 3D animation sequences featuring the 25 most used passwords in the world. Standard, easy-to-guess passwords like ‘123456’ or ‘admin’—frequently the default preset passwords for routers and other devices in the past—still pose a significant security threat to computer systems in general. This collection of well-known passwords is presented in a style of 3D animation often used for YouTube intros. It is very common practice among YouTubers to use short and very to-the-point 3D animations of their logo and name to introduce their channels, and a whole scene of young YouTubers exchange and share the 3D source files (Blender 3D) online to help new channel producers generate their own intros. Though the animations are remixed and altered, the general aesthetics follow a very clear visual concept. All sequences in this video are original designs and arrangements by different creators; the text has been altered to match the top 25 passwords.

 

Art Me!

21. April – 30. July 2022
Group Show, Galerie Charlot, Paris

At the heart of the Art Me! exhibition is the desire to reconsider what unites artists to their artworks, which they inhabit, populate with characters, or open to the public. The idea, therefore, as Allan Kaprow suggested in the Sixties, is that nothing must separate art from life, as attested by his Essays on the Blurring of Art and Life (1993). Nowadays, there are still artists performing happenings whether privately, in the public space, or on the Internet, benefiting from the magic and efficiency of contemporary technologies in order to embody their creations. We must recognise that there are many techniques that encourage artists to rethink the nature of their relationship to the beings that literally ‘populate’ their works, for example: scanning, modelling, or motion capture, and also artificial intelligence. The 3D models thus represented are in the exact measure of real people. It could be a matter of detail, one might think, but in fact this distinction is likely to reinforce the empathy of the audience inevitably recognising itself in a gesture or a posture that is strangely familiar. But revolutions, in art, are also the consequences of the democratisations of the artistic practices due to the emergence of innovations: going from the Kodak film to the Apple iPhone, not to mention the platforms of sharing, precisely where artistic practices mix with those of hobbyists without knowing who influences who! Indeed, how many artists collect their image files by tracking them through their index names in the realm of emojis to create collages that continue well beyond the frames? Finally, there are the artworks of which we are the heroes: the creations that we experience, through manipulation or virtually. By interacting, we magnify technical objects; in immersion, without any body, we become the essential component of the artwork that we complete, in the case that we are not already the artwork itself. Like the artists creating happenings and more widely performers who, in action, not only make an act of creation, but also are the creation itself. This brings us back to the French translation of Allan Kaprow’s book that is even more precise: L’art et la vie confondus. – Dominique Moulon 2022

With: Aram Bartholl – Chun Hua Catherine Dong – Misha Margolis – Matt Pike – Sabrina Ratté – Marie Serruya – Pierrick Sorin – Jeanne Susplugas – Penelope Umbrico – Eric Vernhes – Du Zhenjun

Curation : Dominique Moulon / V.Hasson-Benillouche

Call Me

9. April – 10. June 2022
Group Show, galeriepcp, Paris

In 1979 D. Scott Rogo and Raymond Bayless published their book Phone Calls From the Dead. It brought together reports of paranormal experiences describing phone calls from recently deceased people. The authors connected these narratives to electromagnetic effects and electronic voice phenomenon. These experiences highlight how the phone has become a metaphor for our desire for meaning and communication. The word telephone itself plays on this concept. It comes from the Greek far or distant (τῆλε, tēle), and voice (φωνή, phōnē).

Telephones today are not just audio devices that transform sound into electronic signals. Phones are surfaces onto which we project emotional desire. They are contemporary fetish objects, surveillance devices and encyclopaedias. They isolate and connect. The artworks in this exhibition question this relationship between us and the ‘thing’ in its dumb and symbolic reality.

Curated by Francesca Gavin

with:
Anthony D Green, Aram Bartholl, Britta Thie, Cecilie Norgaard, Christian Ingemann, Cory Arcangel, Damien Roach, Jermaine Francis, Juliette Blightman, Stephen Dunne

House of Mirrors: Artificial Intelligence as Phantasm

9. April – 31. July 2022
Group Show, HMKV, Dortmund

The exhibition House of Mirrors: Artificial Intelligence as Phantasm will address AI-related issues like hidden human labor, algorithmic bias/discrimination, the problem of categorization and classification, and our imaginations and phantasms about AI, and it will also ask the question about whether (and how) it is possible to regain agency in this context. More than 20 artworks by international artists will be presented in an exhibition which will be subdivided into seven thematic chapters and whose scenography will be reminiscent of a giant house of mirrors. In May 2022, a 200-page bi-lingual catalogue will be published (German/English) as printed matter and as a free online PDF.

Participating artists:
Aram Bartholl, Pierre Cassou-Noguès, Stéphane Degoutin, Sean Dockray, Jake Elwes, Anna Engelhardt, Nicolas Gourault, Adam Harvey, Libby Heaney, Lauren Huret, Zheng Mahler, Lauren Lee McCarthy, Simone C Niquille, Elisa Giardina Papa, Julien Prévieux, Anna Ridler, RYBN, Sebastian Schmieg, Gwenola Wagon, Conrad Weise, Mushon Zer-Aviv

Curatored by:
Inke Arns, Francis Hunger, Marie Lechner

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The Glass Room

18. January – 26. November 2022
Group Show, MOD, Adelaide

The Glass Room MOD
The Glass Room is a public intervention that aims to educate about technology. With a sleek tech shop vibe, visitors can freely and critically discuss their relationships with data privacy.

Having toured Europe and the US, it will be visiting Australia for the first time in 2022.

From the tech boom to tech backlash, our understanding of the digital has become both deeply personal and deeply political. Our desire for convenience has given way to questions about the trade-offs for how much we can control our data and our understanding about how it is used.

The Glass Room is a place to explore these ideas. The objects here bring to life the hidden aspects of everyday technologies and examine how they are changing the way we live. The objects in The Glass Room provide unconventional and unexpected ways of seeing your relationship with your data.

As technology becomes embedded in every part of our lives, The Glass Room helps you look deeper into the digital: Does your personal data say everything about you, or is it an imperfect portrait? Do more tools, apps, and information make us better and more efficient, or are we giving away more than we want in return? What goes on behind the screens and inside the black boxes of the devices we interact with everyday? If we knew, would we still sign in or click ‘I agree’? How much trust do users invest in big tech companies, and what can be done if that trust is broken? If you want to learn more, you can visit our Data Detox Bar to pick up our Data Detox Kit, which offers you simple tips to enhance your digital privacy, security, and wellbeing.

Featured Artists:

Dries Depoorter, Aram Bartholl, Kiki Mager, Bengt Sjölén, Danja Vasiliev, Sebastian Schmieg, !Mediengruppe Bitnik, Tega Brain / Sam Lavigne, Kyriaki Goni, La Loma, and Tactical Tech

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Upcoming Events

DFG-Schwerpunktprogramms „Das digitale Bild”

7. – 9. July 2022
Talk, Online, Munich, Marburg

Metapolitisches Hüpfen

10. June 2022
Performance, Grosse Bergstrasse / Goetheplatz, Hamburg

Symposium und antifaschistische Hüpfburg
Große Bergstraße/ Goetheplatz, Hamburg
13:00-19:00 Uhr

Mohamed Amjahid (Vortrag & Diskussion)
Wie aus der Parallelgesellschaft herausspringen?
Über homogen weisse Räume in der Stadt

Aram Bartholl (Performance & Gespräch)
Greetings from Hamburg!
Wie umgehen mit geschichtsrevisionistischer Architektur?

Eduard Freudmann (Vortrag)
Kontextualisierung, Umgestaltung, Weggestaltung
Künstlerische und aktivistische Auseinandersetzungen mit geschichtspolitischen Manifestationen im öffentlichen Raum

Cornelia Siebeck (Thesen & gemeinsames Nachdenken)
Was wir „vergessen“ haben, oder:
Für eine Erinnerungsarbeit ohne Selbstvergewisserung

Nora Sternfeld (Vortrag)
Errungene Erinnerungen
Kontaktzonen umkämpfter und geteilter Geschichte

Gegenwärtig sind wir mit einer rechten Metapolitik konfrontiert, die mit kulturellen Setzungen versucht zivilgesellschaftliche Überzeugungen und kulturelle Diskurse jenseits von Parlamenten nach eigenen Vorstellungen zu verändern. Während das Konzept der Metapolitik eigentlich für den Aufbau einer demokratischen Zivilgesellschaft gedacht war, zielt die Neue Rechte darauf ab, gesellschaftliche Komplexität auf essentialistische Vorstellungen von Kultur, Nation und Volk zu reduzieren. Mit Rekonstruktionen historischer Architektur, ideologischer Inanspruchnahme von Orten, aber auch Angriffen auf Parlamente versucht sie abgeschlossene Identitäten zu konstruieren. Im Ringen um die kulturelle Hegemonie entwendet die Neue Rechte auch den Künsten ihre Strategien, mit denen zuvor noch für eine offene und vielfältige Gesellschaft eingetreten wurde. Sie richtet die performativen Methoden nun gegen die vielfältige Kultur selbst. Dafür dreht sie das kritische Potential der Künste in eine affirmative Symbolhaftigkeit um und verwendet das progressive Moment der Künste für ihre regressiven Ideen.

Obwohl die permanente Gefahr besteht, die entwickelten künstlerischen Praxen in den Händen von Personen mit autoritären und völkischen Vorstellungen wiederzufinden, besteht nach wie vor die Notwendigkeit mit Kunst Ideen davon zu entwickeln, wie wir als Gesellschaft gerne zusammenleben wollen. Metapolitisches Hüpfen bietet den Anlass, rechte Metapolitik zu diskutieren und schafft zugleich den Raum, um Gegenstrategien zu entwickeln. Um die Frage nach dem Umgang mit symbolischen Räumen so zuzuspitzen, dass sie sichtbar und diskutierbar wird, wird das Hambacher Schloss als Symbol für Demokratie aber auch nationalistische Vereinnahmung in eine antifaschistische Hüpfburg transformiert. Die Architektur wird zur Infrastruktur für ein eintägiges Symposium im öffentlichen Raum, das Widersprüchlichkeit zulässt und auf dem nicht nur theoretisch, sondern auch praktisch und performativ Strategien gegen rechte Metapolitik entwickelt, erprobt und debattiert werden.

Mit: Mohamed Amjahid, Aram Bartholl, Eduard Freudmann, Cornelia Siebeck und Nora Sternfeld
Konzeption: Frieder Bohaumilitzky
Grafikdesign Flyer & Plakat: Torben Körschkes

www.metapolitisches-huepfen.de

Recent Events

Domestic Drama

14. December 2021 – 20. February 2022
Group Show, Halle Für Kunst, Graz

“Alle Gegenstände, die uns umgeben, haben eine eigene Seele, haben menschliche Qualitäten, weil sie nur in einer menschlichen Welt existieren. Es gibt eigentlich keine Gegenstände, die der Mensch wahrnimmt. Es gibt keine rohen, unmenschlichen Objekte. In dem Moment, in dem Möbel, Häuser, Brot, Autos, Fahrräder oder andere Produkte in unserem Leben auftauchen, sind sie mit uns verbunden, sie sind menschlich.”Ernest Dichter, The Strategy of Desire, Martino Publishing, Mansfield, 2012. S. 93.

Domestic Drama möchte durch den bewusst ​„theatralen Auftritt“ der künstlerischen Arbeiten und die gattungsüberschreitende Art der Inszenierung des Wohnraums eine körperliche Teilhabe beim Publikum herausfordern. Im weiteren Schritt erkennt die Ausstellung Emotionalität als einen wichtigen Faktor für unser Handeln an, das längst nicht mehr autonom von uns selbst sondern auch durch die uns umgebenden Objekte und Prozesse gesteuert wird. Die poetische aber dennoch subversiv-kritische Narration, die in Domestic Drama gesponnen wird, versucht so die Vielschichtigkeit der Fragen, Probleme und Mechanismen, die in unserem Alltag im ​„Zuhause” auftauchen, ins Zentrum der Aufmerksamkeit zu rücken.

Curated by Cathrin Mayer

With:
Larry Achiampong, Ayo Akingbade, Aram Bartholl, Camille Blatrix, Oscar Enberg, Vera Frenkel, Nigel Gavus & İlkin Beste Çırak, Antony Gormley, Mona Hatoum, Kaarel Kurismaa, Nicola L., Bertrand Lavier, Olu Ogunnaike, Laura Põld, Bruno Zhu

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Decision Making – L’instant décisif

9. December 2021 – 13. March 2022
Group Show, Canadien Cultural Centre, Paris

Decisions are the result of complex cognitive processes. Considering them collectively when they involve our shared futures makes them harder to make. But, more and more often, we include machines into such processes through algorithms qualified as decisional. Of course, it raises questions that artists know how to put into perspective. Because of the age that we are currently living in, a brief instant regarding the whole history of our planet, is decisive considering the choices available to us for a responsible development of Artificial Intelligence. Therefore, it is now that human rights are at stake, for instance, about what will emerge from the use of our personal data. The consideration of artworks coming from decisive processes connecting humans to machines could only spring us into an immediate future that still belongs to us.

Curated by Dominique Moulon & Alain Thibault

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Stampede

26. November 2021 – 9. January 2022
Group Show, Horse & Pony, Berlin

Stampede, Eight Years at Horse & Pony

Opening 26 November, 14-21h
On view 27 November – 9 January, Saturdays & Sundays, 12-18h and by appointment
U-Bhf Leinestrasse / S- & U-Bhf Hermannstrasse
Altenbrakerstrasse 18, 12053 Berlin

Including work from Shahin Afrassiabi, Matt Ager, Josefin Arnell, Diana Artus, Khaled Barakeh, Aram Bartholl, Julie Beugin, David Blandy, Elijah Burgher, Julia Colavita, Beth Collar, Zuzanna Czebatul, Christa Joo Hyun D’Angelo, Caroline David, Lucinda Dayhew, Herbert de Colle, Cheryl Donegan, Claude Eigan, Paul Ferens, Kasia Fudakowski, Dakota Gearhart, GeoVanna Gonzales, Monika Grabuschnigg, Seamus Heidenreich, Nate Heiges, Kathi Hofer, Nick Jeffrey, Jake Kent, kg, Julian-Jakob Kneer, Nuri Koerfer, leckhaus, Carol Anne McChrystal, Ryan McNamara, Liz McTernan, Zoë Claire MIller, Adrien Missika, Robert Muntean, Nightmare City, Yotaro Niwa, Florian Oellers, Omsk Social Club, Anne-Sofie Overgaard, Silas Parry, Tamen Perez, Angelo Plessas, Tobias Preisig, Hannes Ribarits, Tina Ribarits, Liz Rosenfeld, Lorenzo Sandoval, Fette Sans, Isa Schmidlehner, Maximilian Schmoetzer, Jonas Schoeneberg, Sarah Schoenfeld, Pacifico Silano, Louise Sparre, Jennifer Sullivan, Valinia Svoronou, Anna Szaflarski, Johanna Tiedtke, Viktor Timofeev, Titre Provisoire (Marcel Dickhage & Cathleen Schuster), Marie von Heyl, Derick Decario Ladale Whitson, Helga Wretman, Thomas Yeomans, Lauryn Youden, & Anna Zett.

Museum of Cryptography

10. November 2021 – 6. February 2022
Group Show, Museum of Cryptography, Moscow

2021 году в Москве откроется первый в России Музей криптографии.

Широкой аудитории будет представлено прошлое, настоящее и будущее криптографии, математики и смежных дисциплин. Музей криптографии станет новой точкой притяжения на карте города — местом, где доступно и просто говорят о развитии современных технологий.

Здание, в котором будет расположен Музей криптографии, впервые откроет свои двери для широкой публики. В советские годы это была знаменитая «шарашка» в Марфино, где ученые разрабатывали аппаратуру для шифрования телефонной связи.

Важной частью музея станут мультимедийные экспонаты, инфографика и интерактивные островки формата look&feel, а также редкие экземпляры научных трудов.

Внимание! Молодежная команда Музея криптографии сформирована. Подробности

Blog Archive for Tag: podcast

Crossing Property Lines

July 18, 2020

Prof. Agnes Förster and Martin Bangratz from Urban planing RWTH Aachen invited me to their podcast series “Whats Next“. Below their article accompanying the conversation in German. Thx!!

 https://www.planung-neu-denken.de/podcasts/crossing-property-lines/

Crossing Property Lines

The relatively soft lockdown in Germany has forced innovation on many firms and schools, revealing the country’s shortcomings in the area of digital transformation, such as broadband access. While some of Aram Bartholl’s friends in the arts and programming scene notice hardly any difference in their routines, other, less digitalized professions have been hit hard. For Mr. Bartholl himself, teaching online has turned out to be a challenge. But what struck him most was the temporary absence of urban public space as a platform for expression. It feels liberating to see large demonstrations back in the city, both for noble and questionable causes.

Aram Bartholl’s work has dealt with digital space since his thesis in architectural studies in 2001. Back then he started with simple interventions – taking boxes from computer games and placing them in the city. He was looking at games such as first-person shooters, where the knowledge of a virtual space is crucial to the gameplay. And he found himself wondering: what does it mean to place objects from a digital realm into physical space? Do the spaces merge, or do they still belong to separate worlds?

This dualism of what is analogue and what is digital is so intertwined these days, that we are unable to distinguish one from the other. […] Of course, everything that happens there is real, it has an effect on our lives. Aram Bartholl 06/2020

A number of techno-social upheavals of our lifetime have influenced Bartholl’s work, as he observes the permeation of digital technology. The first disillusionment around 2000, when the dotcom bubble burst, the introduction of smartphones in 2007, the rise of global Internet corporations. Aram Bartholl has followed these trends closely and is still astonished by the dynamics of these tools which are so inscribed in our society; a tweet by the American president may cause immediate reactions in the stock market or foreign relations. The effects of technological developments are also becoming increasingly manifest in our cities. An early example were delivery services that visibly affect urban logistics and business closures. More recently, electric scooters and bicycles have turned up in cities worldwide – demanding our attention with a colorful design reminiscent of animated icons back in a web 2.0 era. They are objects that seem to bring the promise of a trendy internet startup into urban space, Silicon Valley Solutionism arriving in cities around the globe. Unsurprisingly, their promise of a shift towards sustainable mobility has yet to occur, as that would require political guidance and many other factors to align.

Urban space has always been a native ground for Bartholl’s work. To him, it is more exciting than the white cube with its preconceived notions and expectations about art. Outside, the audience is random and may start a discourse that would never happen in a controlled artistic environment. To encourage people to think critically about the relationship of private property and public space, Aram Bartholl recently took rental bikes from the street to exhibit them as sculptures in a gallery. Visitors were still free to rent the bikes and take them back outside, but the project challenged people’s notions of ownership, of public and private space. In a follow-up project, Bartholl is fishing algae-covered electric scooters out of Berlin’s channels to display at Kunstraum Kreuzberg, showing once again that their promise of sustainability doesn’t hold water.

We are currently experiencing social media and the internet profoundly as a public space for discussion – in contrast to urban space – even though these platforms are run by private firms, with all the problems this entails. Aram Bartholl 06/2020

Just as private objects start to clog up public space, the digital space we perceive as public space is in fact in the hands of private corporations. Inoffensive mottos and ludic logotypes suggest harmlessness, but these firms are ultimately listed and profit-oriented. This seems problematic considering the history of privatization of other public infrastructures. Europe is hard-pressed to develop independent digital infrastructures.

In 2010, Aram Bartholl began a project that has since turned into a global movement: Dead Drops are flash drives embedded in a wall so that only the USB connector sticks out. Not connected to the internet, they constitute a statement against censorship and about the relationship between our new, digital reality, and the brick and mortar of cities. New Dead Drops still pop up, over 2.500 are currently listed globally [link: deaddrops.com]. Sharing things digitally through concepts such as open source and creative commons has led to unprecedented levels of collective production and consumption of content. Movements such as Fridays For Future or Black Lives Matter would not have been possible without the viral effects of social networks. In another recent example, the German hacker and programming community has pushed the government to adopt an open-source approach to their COVID19 tracking app.

Data should be free, Bartholl agrees, yet he urges us to consider what could happen with our data in the future. If research institutions are using photos found online to train artificial intelligence models that may ultimately be used for military purposes, it raises questions about the merit of uploading billions of images each day. And movements such as the alt-right have been quick to adopt internet and meme culture and learned to improve their own false-flag tactics.

Aram Bartholl continues his investigation of technology and space. Given the current discussion around the removal of outmoded monuments, he tinkers with augmented reality to attach digital artefacts to sculptures. And, referencing the hashtag #natureishealing, he announces that he will be fishing for more discarded bicycles in the river Spree.

Aram Bartholl is a Berlin based concept artist who investigates the relationship between digital and physical space. Since 2019, Bartholl teaches art with a focus on digital media as a professor at Hamburg University of Applied Sciences.

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Radio Spätkauf: Interview

June 29, 2020

This mini episode features Daniel Stern interviewing artist Aram Barthall about his recent installation “Unlock Life” which utilizes remnants of the recent bike share boom.

Find out more about at Aram Bartholl at https://arambartholl.com and see the exhibit until the 16th of August at https://www.kunstraumkreuzberg.de.

http://www.radiospaetkauf.com/2020/06/rs-mini-unlock-life/

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Post-Digital Self. Die Kunst der modernen Maskerade

April 27, 2020


MdbK Podcast #019: LINK IN BIO, 27.4.2020

Wie werden heute im digitalen Alltag die Frage & Veränderung des Gesichtes, Gesichtserkennung und Facefilter diskutiert?
In der letzten MdbK [talk]-Folge zur Ausstellung LINK IN BIO, sprechen wir mit Aram Bartholl, Hanneke Klaver und Jeremy Bailey über „Post-Digital Self. Die Kunst der modernen Maskerade“. War die Maske seit der Ur- und Frühgeschichte ein fassbares Objekt, verschwimmen mittels digitaler Technologien die Grenzen zwischen Maske und Gesicht. Der deutsche Medienkünstler Bartholl kuratierte gemeinsam mit Anika Meier die „Speed Show“ zum Thema Post-Digital Self, in der die Geschichte der Netzkunst erzählt wird. In einem Internetcafe klickte man sich so durch Arbeiten von NetzkünstlerInnen, wie Jeremy Bailey und Hanneke Klaver, die Identitätsbildung reflektieren und auf den Gesichtsfiltertrend reagieren.

SHOWNOTES
Einleitung 0:00 (Deutsch)
Aram Bartholl 2:43 (Deutsch)
Hanneke Klaver 13:00 (English)
Jeremy Bailey 20:00 (English)
Schluss 26:21 (Deutsch)

Der Kanadier Jeremy Bailey hat in seinem Video „The Future of Television“ (2012) den digitalen Gesichtsfiltertrend gewissermaßen vorhergesehen. Er arbeitet mit einer Gesichtserkennungssoftware. Die Zukunft des Fernsehens ist für Bailey im Jahr 2012, was heute die sozialen Medien sind: Orte der Identitätsbildung.

Die Serie #freetheexpression der niederländischen Künstlerin Hanneke Klaver ist eine Reaktion auf den Gesichtsfiltertrend. Mit Strohalmen, Metalldraht, Holz, Papier und Kleber stellt Klaver analog Filter her, die sie wie Bastelbögen verteilt. Mit ihren nicht standardisierten Gesichtsfiltern befürwortet sie die freie Meinungsäußerung.

Der deutsche Medienkünstler Aram Bartholl entwickelte im Jahr 2010 ein Ausstellungsformat, das aus einem Internet Café für einen Abend einen Ausstellungsraum macht. Im Rahmen der „Speed Show“ ist auf diesen Computern Netzkunst zu sehen. Kunst, die das Internet als Medium nutzt, sich mit den genuinen Eigenschaften des Internets auseinandersetzt und die Technik thematisiert, mit der sie arbeitet. Netzkunst existiert nicht erst, seit das Internet für ein Massenpublikum zugänglich geworden ist, aber die sozialen Medien machen es einem breiteren Publikum möglich, im Alltag bewusst oder unbewusst Netzkunst zu sehen.

LINK IN BIO. Kunst nach den sozialen Medien zeigte mit über 50 Arbeiten, wie sich Produktion und Rezeption von Kunst im Zeitalter sozialer Medien verändern. Die Gruppenausstellung endete mit der temporären Schließung des MdbK. Wir konnten uns glücklicherweise noch vorher mit einigen KünstlerInnen für diese und weitere MdbK [talk]-Folgen zusammensetzen.